Hacker News Re-Imagined

Stephen Hawking has died

  • 6015 points
  • 3 years ago

  • @Cogito
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Stephen Hawking has died


@soesoe1221 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa<>"'

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@pizza 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@interlocutor 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

FWIW, Stephen Hawking's son works in the tech industry. He is a software engineer at Microsoft. See https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/real-life-stories/stephen-hawk...

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@artursapek 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@klinskyc 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Aw man. I don't have anything profound, but I always smile when I read this XKCD - https://xkcd.com/799/

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@aerioux 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP one of the greatest physicists in human history

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@ulkesh 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

The world is now diminished by the loss of this brilliant mind. Though I take comfort that he enriched humanity for all time.

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@creep 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Wow, that really sucks.

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@hienyimba 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

One of the greatest men of our time. RIP Sir!

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@simonsarris 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Dost thou love hawking? Thou hast hawks will soar

Above the morning lark.

– Shakespeare

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@otalp 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

His last comment on the Internet is relevant to Hacker News.. someone asked him about unemployment due to automation and the rise of technology[1]:

"If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed. Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine-owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution. So far, the trend seems to be toward the second option, with technology driving ever-increasing inequality."

https://www.reddit.com/r/science/comments/3nyn5i/comment/cvs...

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@_ZeD_ 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@aurelius12 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I realize it's not cool to post value-less comments here, but....damn it.

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@neelkadia 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@smithmayowa 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Very sad news for the physic and science community in general his book A brief history of time made me understand black holes.

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@LearnerHerzog 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

A man with truly inspiring perspectives... of the cosmos and of the self.

"In fact, my disability has been a help in a way, it has freed me from teaching or sitting on boring committees and given me more time to think and do research. Theoretical physics is one of the few fields in which being disabled is no handicap — it is all in the mind." -Stephen Hawking

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@PaulHoule 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

At risk of being voted down I will say that the time in which Hawking has worked has been a "dark ages" for physics in my mind. (As a physics PhD; and I don't blame Hawking for this, rather the rest of the environment.)

Circa 1970 the number of physics PhD's produced has outstripped the number of permanent jobs in physics, sometimes by a factor of 30:1!

One result of that is that physicists have to make it through a keyhole to get established. Another change that has happened since then has been a profound disconnect between theory and experiment. Back in the day, Einstein could make a prediction about light being bent by the Sun and have it be confirmed in his own lifetime.

The "modern" physics superstar like Hawking or Witten just doesn't do that. When neutron oscillations were finally detected after years, it is almost forgotten who to give credit for for the theory because it is really just a conjecture that some matrix element isn't zero. Even in condensed matter there is the spectacle of seeing theoreticians dogpile on the problem of cuprate oxide superconductivity for 20 years without making any progress until an experimentalist noted stripes in the electron density.

The result of it is that you get ahead by getting the approval of much older physicists, not by understanding the world.

As for Hawking himself, his ideas about information loss in black holes, the wavefunction not being unitary and all that were just plain bad ideas that held back quantum gravity by 30 years or so.

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@sus_007 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Do we know what killed him? All of these articles have very little information. Was it the natural progression of ALS or some other kind of disease?

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@anoopelias 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Born on the same day as Galileo died and died on the same day as Einstein was born.

'Stars were aligned' :) I guess.

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@whiddershins 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I can’t explain why, but I’ve never felt so appreciative of the HN black bar

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@zw123456 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

He was an amazing inspiration to me and I am sure many others. I raise a glass tonight to a very special human being.

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@giis 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP Stephen Hawking

I'm one of those million of lives you have inspired. I brought A Brief History of Time with my first salary. Thank you for everything.

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@ultrasounder 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Respects and R.I.P. Will make my son read his Brief History of Time to start his career in science.

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@dustfinger 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Goodbye.

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@abvdasker 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Stephen Hawking was a great physicist and an inspirational person. He'll be missed dearly.

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@amai 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

"And however difficult life may seem, there's always something you can do and succeed at."

-- Stephen Hawking

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrVVvXOIwQc

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@JepZ 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

"I don’t think we will survive another 1,000 years without escaping beyond our fragile planet,..."

This mission statement for humanity is what I will keep with my inner compass.

RIP Stephen Hawking

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@juliand 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Thank you for everything

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@jaequery 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

He was a living triumph. Lived and achieved beyond what his body would allow.

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@mojomark 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Dr. Hawking has had a profound influance on my life, and I presume the same for many others on HN. For some reason I found solace today in this song "Page One", which I'm just going to leave here:

https://open.spotify.com/track/2HZEJcDdPUh1umsw4qcY1X?si=3Vf...

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@natalyarostova 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@Insanity 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

May he rest in peace. As a kid, I loved reading "a brief history of time". To me, both Hawking and RFP have been influential in discovering my passion for the sciences. A great loss for sure, but at a beautiful age, especially considering ALS.

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@l3robot 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP to one of the great. Not only he was one of the genius minds of our time, but he also was an important symbol of perseverance for all of us.

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@tpowell 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

What a life.

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@TheAceOfHearts 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

A great loss for humanity.

Is this the fastest upvoted HN thread? I don't think I've ever seen a discussion go up to +200 upvotes in under 10 minutes.

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@allpratik 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I always thought Stephen Hawking to be an epitome of what could science possibly do. The way he had used technology to remain alive as well work productively for so long is really mesmerising.

One of my close friend recently lost his entire vision due to optic nerve atrophy. And since then he is sort of lost and we used Stephen Hawking example many times to cheer him and overcome his new disability. And it works as well.

It hurts me a lot to realise now that one of the greatest dreamer of our time is simply gone now.

Sadly his brief period has come to an end.

RIP Stephen Hawking.

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@icc97 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

A quote I got from my Harvest timer this morning:

> “The past, like the future, is indefinite and exists only as a spectrum of possibilities.”

> – Stephen Hawking

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@imesh 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

What does aging feel like for someone who can't feel their body?

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@Errsher 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@mattcaldwell 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Wow, that hits hard... he will be missed.

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@ddmma 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

At least humanity will buy and read more Stephen Hawking books from now on. We must feel more special only by sharing the our timeline with this brilliant mind. More great discoveries and light will be in the future, we will exist to provide proof of the visionaries.

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@thomasfortes 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

There are few people that will be remembered for centuries and centuries to come, but I'm pretty sure that Stephen Hawking is one of them.

Rest in peace Dr. Hawking, the scientific community and all the science enthusiasts in the world will hold your contributions and the story of your life dearly in their hearts.

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@Invictus0 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Wow, I was not prepared for this. Rest in peace.

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@By-Jokese 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP Stephen Hawking.

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@jtchang 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Stephen Hawking defined an entire generation. Say what you will but he created a culture far beyond that of just a physicist. He was both parodied and revered.

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@galaga99 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

There aren't that many humans that have made such a dent in the world as Stephen Hawking.

He will not be forgotten.

Rest in peace.

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@7ero 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@wizardforhire 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Few have accomplished as much while overcoming so little compared to Hawkings. Hawkings is and will always be a hero.

To think when he started out black holes were just a myth. He got to witness not only their acceptance and his own vindication but actual gravitational waves as well!

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@doppp 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

On Pi Day, no less. RIP.

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@senderista 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Best tribute I've read, from his collaborator Roger Penrose: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/mar/14/stephen-hawk...

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@nzoschke 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

A Brief History Of Time expanded my mind like few other books. Thank you Dr. Hawking.

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@pknerd 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

His book, A Bried History of Time have made a huge impact among people like me to fall in love with Physics.

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@rvo 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Let's celebrate his amazing life.

"The diagnosis of motor neurone disease came when Hawking was 21, in 1963. At the time, doctors gave him a life expectancy of two years.[253][254]"

It must be quite taxing to have been given that diagnosis at such a young age, and then live to a relatively old age. I wonder how that marginally impacted his view on life, work and relationships.

Sad he didn't get the Nobel.

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@davesque 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I feel like Stephen Hawking symbolized the exact way in which people should be judged.

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@joering2 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Now he can travel anywhere he wants to in this or all other Universes, instantenously. RIP big guy!

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@sprice 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

While Stephen Hawking is someone who could not live forever, he is someone we needed to.

RIP.

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@tabeth 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Perhaps just as shocking to me as this news was the fact that he was 76! Given his accomplishments and youthful demeanor in his recent communications this totally caught me off guard. That, and the fact that he lived way longer that expected, given his circumstances. Objectively a triumph. In addition to his obvious, scientific exploits, hopefully the money raised in 2014 for ALS will ensure future scientists won't have to endure such hardship.

Rest in peace.

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@intopieces 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I'd like us to take a moment to recognize how excellent his website is:

http://www.hawking.org.uk/

Straight to the point. Easy to navigate. The most modern addition is the facebook like button, but even that is unobtrusive.

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@dandersh 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

While people are going to focus on his impact in physics and science in general, and rightfully so, I've experienced a greater impact from his life.

I had a close friend of mine who was wheel chair bound. For him Hawking demonstrated the possibility of people accepting him for who he was and enjoying his company irrespective of any perceived differences. He wanted to interact, have friends, build relationships, and this was something that was more expected as a result of Hawking's public profile.

Ultimately he served as not just a role model, but someone who expanded awareness that those in wheelchairs were people too.

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@mevile 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I'm so sad. Rest in peace Mr Hawking. What brilliant mind we've lost.

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@bhnmmhmd 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Like many others, my first reaction to this news was "Whaaat? WTF?"

He was a great man, and a true inspiration to all of us. May he rest in peace. It's weird now, because I feel like the generation of physicists who were able to get close to people and think about the really important problems, is simply gone.

His death reminded me how much enthusiastic I was about the origin(s) of the universe and such fundamental questions. But like many others, I couldn't find my way in science and am now millions of miles away from that. Maybe everyone has a path (destiny) and mine wasn't in science.

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@vkat 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

He is going to remembered for a long time. RIP

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@Aloha 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

He was 76, for a man not expected to make it out of his 20's I think he did okay.

It's a sad loss for science, but he's also now freed from a body he was becoming increasingly locked in, with less and less ability to communicate over time.

His passing is perhaps more humane - I don't know though, humaneness is in the eye of the person living it.

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@Dangeranger 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

“I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I’m not afraid of death, but I’m in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first.”

-- Stephen Hawking

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@wolph 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

He's the perfect example of how much you can achieve even on borrowed time. There's never a reason to truly lose hope

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@fellellor 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP Stephen Hawking. Thanks for fighting on for so long, even after reaching a stage when most would expect one to give up.

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@dzink 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

He proved the body is just a carrier for the mind.

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@pvsukale3 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I read A brief history of time when I was 11. Since then every single time I have reread the book I have found something new. I waited every Monday night for his show into the universe with Stephan Hawkins. He was the reason I became more curious and skeptical about nature of things. My hats off to this amazing conscious being made from stardust.

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@SpaceManNabs 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Pouring a glass and will read some of his papers again tonight. So sad. Great inspiration. Great hero.

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@applecrazy 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Is it possible to get a "black bar" on HN to honor this god of physics, who contributed so much to the literature and inspired many people, including myself?

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@lucb1e 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

So long, and thanks for all the fish.

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@Arubis 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I wish I had the words, and know that I won’t. But there was a time when A Brief History made me feel a little less alone in those socially awkward years, and I’m eternally indebted for that.

Rest in peace, good sir. You’ve earned it.

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@mullikine 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Im truly gut wrenched hearing about this. Such an inspirational person. Thank you God for giving us Hawking

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@joshumax 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

For a second I just couldn't believe this was real. Stephen Hawking was one of those people that inspired me towards a career in science, as well as a pursuit of discovering what mysteries of the universe I could uncover within my (cosmically short) lifetime. He did this not through some major life-altering speech I heard from him (although his talks and lectures were quite interesting), or through some grand quote that I read online, but rather through the fact that he carried with him the enthusiasm that comes with looking up, seeing a vast universe looming all around us, and finding that inner spirit--that inner sense of wonder--that drives us forward in an attempt to make sense of it all. Rest in peace Stephen Hawking; you will be missed.

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@Dangeranger 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

“What do Sheldon Cooper and a black hole have in common?” Hawking asked the fictional Caltech physicist whose IQ comfortably outstrips his social skills.

After a pause, the answer came: “They both suck.”

Stephen's sense of humor has always cracked me up.

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@Cookingboy 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

His life had surely been a bright spot in the brief history of our times.

Rest in peace Mr.Hawking.

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@OrganicMSG 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Wasn't he still working on physics? If so, I prefer the terminology of Erdős, he hasn't died, he has merely left.

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@Profragile 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

OMG! Neil disGrace Tyson's tweet. What a pompous fucking ass-shat. It should have been him.

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@milkers 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

... on the day of PI, r.i.p S.H.

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@nagarc 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@originalsimba 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

ouch... right in the feels.

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@troymc 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Growing up in the middle of nowhere, Canada in the 1980s, the library didn't have many good science books. When Hawking's book got published, it was the only thing available like that anywhere around. Remember, this is before you could get any book in existence within one month via Amazon. There was no Amazon.

I got A Brief History of Time and read it, and it's almost cliche to say so, but it changed the course of my life. It's not the only book that affected me, but it was pivotal. George Gamow's little book also was available, and some good Asimov stuff, but otherwise nothing really.

So I went to university in the big city (Saskatoon!) and studied physics, and they had a whole library of physics books! You'd think it was like heaven, but a lot of those books were crap or hard to read. Hawking showed how one can aim for a book that's interesting-and-good and actually achieve it. A few others managed to do the same. There are probably 20 actually-good and readable physics books in the whole world, and his books are a few of them.

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@pinkskip 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

a hero who fuelled my curiosity

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@BooneJS 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@dev1n 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I remember being in the fifth grade and finding my dad’s copy of “A Brief History of Time” and thinking to myself “wow that’s an interesting title..” I read it all (barely understanding any of it really cause I was 10) to my hearts content. That book taught me how to ask questions and think differently. I am so so grateful to have inhabited the Earth the same time Stephen Hawking did. Thank you for igniting my curiosity. Rest In Peace.

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@vit05 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

My grandmother had ALS. I remember when my mother went to tell me about her disease she gave me his book[1]. It helped me in two ways, to research more about the disease, many articles were about him, and to learn more about the universe.

Rest in peace. https://www.amazon.com/Universe-Nutshell-Stephen-William-Haw...

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@amyl27 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Rest In Peace Hawking

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@AtomicOrbital 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

description of some of the work Stephen has left us https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsNjHaKwN5E

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@onetimemanytime 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP, he did a lot to popularize science.

Let's look at a different angle: He lived to 76 years old, a man with a disease that once gave you a few years at most. 76 is more or less a full life today. With all the challenges and stresses, we (or a lot of us) do live in great times. Even the greatest King could have died from a cut on his finger a few centuries ago...now penicillin is given for free even in USA.

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@scraft 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

You ignored what life presented you, And strived to achieve your goal. You took the time to share with us, The universe, big and small.

You reminded us what makes a man, Comes from deep inside. With your wicked sense of humour, And your persistence to survive.

We thank you for all that you did, And for all that you will do. You may no longer live amongst us, But we will still look up to you.

RIP Stephen Hawking, 1942-2018.

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@pankajdoharey 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Sad day for Science. :(

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@GenYCubeJockey 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Gone but never to be forgotten. He just finally found the Fry Hole...I mean, Hawking Hole.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AW-p8s_HCCo

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@jjordan 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Right up there with Einstein, Bohr, Tesla as one of the most brilliant humans to ever live. Learning about Hawking radiation for the first time forever changed how I looked at this thing we call existence. Thanks, Stephen.

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@siliconunit 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Like many here he was an inspiration for me too, I read his books at an early age and along with others it got me inspired to pursue scientific studies. It also helped me come to terms with the fear of death and eventually see the odds of sentient life and appreciate the ride without the egotistic entitled feeling that sparks that fear in the first place.Rip Stephen.

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@orangehour 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Stephen Hawking (along with Richard Feynman) are the reasons for my interest in the Sciences. There's nothing I can say now to thank him, but I will always cherish his works.

"Nothing is better than reading and gaining more and more knowledge" - Stephen Hawking

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@xoa 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I can think of no higher praise then that he changed the course of so many of our lives personally and of humanity's understanding of the universe as a whole. Though small in physical stature he has become a truly giant set of shoulders upon which many more shall stand. Thank you for everything.

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@DennisAleynikov 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Rest in peace, I never thought I'd see this day come, he almost seemed immortal.

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@intopieces 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

If you have not seen it, the documentary “A Brief History of Time,” which is not an adaptation of the book but interviews with Hawking and his colleagues, and family, is excellent and worth your time.

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@richardfeynman 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I accidentally ate Stephen Hawking's lunch once at a conference at Caltech.

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@Sandorie 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

This is truly saddening for the scientific community and for the world in general.

His life and work will continue to ripple the very fabric of our civilization.

And now that his task is done, He will take his place... amongst the legends of the past.

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@miguelmota 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

"Look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see, and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious."

- Stephen Hawking

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@amyjess 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I'm going to provide a slightly different perspective from what I've seen, not just here but in other communities as well.

I've seen a lot of people talking about how his death was such a horrible thing, how it saddens them. I don't see it that way. Sure, the world was a better place with his expertise, but the man had been suffering for decades with one of the most horrifying diseases in the world, and in the end I'm just glad that he's not suffering anymore. I hope that, wherever he is, he's finally free.

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@kuon 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Thanks for who you were and what you did. You will live on with us.

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@stochastic_monk 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Stephen Hawking was very special to me. He's a large part of why I chose a life in science in general and physics in particular.

I'm just one of many, but he unmistakably and uniquely affected my life for the better.

Growing up, I read Brief History of Time and Universe In A Nutshell dozens of times each. I relished the jokes I got, and I won't forget him.

I also weep for him, knowing he never got the Nobel prize he wanted so very much.

I haven't shed a tear for many people in their passing, but I have for him.

Thank you for opening my eyes to the wonders of the universe. You are an irreplaceable part of who I have become today.

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@0xb100db1ade 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I mean no disrespect, but I find it bitter-sweetly amusing that, of all days, he died on Pi Day

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi_Day

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@Dangeranger 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

"It would not be much of a universe if it wasn't home to the people you love."

-- Stephen Hawking

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@eganist 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I can't say I feel qualified to make the sorts of truly inspiring tributes I'm reading so far. I just want it known that one more person appreciates all he's done to motivate people such as myself to look up at the stars and pursue a career chasing them.

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@acutesoftware 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP - he was a great inspiration to so many people

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@your-nanny 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

One stable genius died yesterday, RIP. The other can fall into a black hole.

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@hypertexthero 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@Cogito 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

One of my most enduring memories is putting on the audio book for "A Brief History of Time" to listen to on a long drive home with my brother.

I'd read and listened to it before, but sitting there watching my brother listen to it for the first time, I realised just how clearly and succinctly Hawking mapped out the ideas and way of thinking I use to try and find my place in the universe.

I'm quite grateful I had the opportunity to read it.

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@n17r4m 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Even if there is only one possible unified theory, it is just a set of rules and equations. What is it that breathes fire into the equations and makes a universe for them to describe? The usual approach of science of constructing a mathematical model cannot answer the questions of why there should be a universe for the model to describe. Why does the universe go to all the bother of existing? Is the unified theory so compelling that it brings about its own existence? Or does it need a creator, and, if so, does he have any other effect on the universe? And who created him?

Up to now, most scientists have been too occupied with the development of new theories that describe what the universe is to ask the question why. On the other hand, the people whose business it is to ask why, the philosophers, have not been able to keep up with the advance of scientific theories. In the eighteenth century, philosophers considered the whole of human knowledge, including science, to be their field and discussed questions such as: did the universe have a beginning? However, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, science became too technical and mathematical for the philosophers, or anyone else except a few specialists. Philosophers reduced the scope of their inquiries so much that Wittgenstein, the most famous philosopher of this century, said, “The sole remaining task for philosophy is the analysis of language.” What a comedown from the great tradition of philosophy from Aristotle to Kant!

However, if we do discover a complete theory, it should in time be understandable in broad principle by everyone, not just a few scientists. Then we shall all, philosophers, scientists, and just ordinary people, be able to take part in the discussion of the question of why it is that we and the universe exist. If we find the answer to that, it would be the ultimate triumph of human reason – for then we would know the mind of God.

-- Stephen Hawking

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@jordanpg 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Hawking plays The Guide Mark II in the new BBC radio dramatization of book 6 of the Hitchhiker’s Guide “trilogy”: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p060hy01

A wonderful, somehow fitting, celebration.

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@nukeop 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Hawking's reputation will last as long after his death as that of Sagan, Gould, Boaz, Lysenko, Morris or any of the other popular culture performing cranks of this century. About ten minutes.

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@racl101 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Talk about beating the odds.

He showed ALS who's boss! He demonstrated that when you have a purpose and the will to live one can overcome their limitations.

He inspired me and countless of others.

R.I.P. Dr. Hawking.

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@kakarot 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

RIP my biggest living scientific inspiration. May your weary soul rest in peace.

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@jonbarker 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

We owe him, Sagan, Feynman and a few others a debt of gratitude for writing and speaking about their discoveries to the general public. Without their realization that more people should be aware of this stuff, no popular science!

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@nbdev 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Not one negative comment in this whole thread. Everyone is enamoured with Hawking, huh? Ask the women in his life what they thought of him. Ask the scientists, including Peter Higgs, who complained about his undue credibility and attention given to him.

Disagree with me? Think I'm speaking negative about the dead? If you call yourself inspired by a scientist, admiring a scientist, then you should seek the truth. Emotion based on truth I can stand, but the outpouring in this thread is ridiculous.

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@justmyopinion1 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I always felt like God saw SH and felt like he is going too fast in his discoveries toward God and may end up discovering God which God obviously doesn't want to happen and so wen he saw that at SH's age of 21 he hit the motor neuron switch off and just left his life and mind on so that everyone can know what SH has done so far.

RIP SH.

Wherever he has gone, if there is any remote possibility to contact us back, i am sure he will figure it out. Am just gonna keep waiting to hear back from him...

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@slavik81 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

That man was my hero. If I achieve a fraction of what he accomplished in his life, I will be incredibly proud.

Against all odds, he lived a full and amazing life. It somehow feels even more painful to lose a man who cheated death. It just gives you that feeling that they can somehow live forever, until the moment when the illusion is shattered.

And underneath it all is that unshakable feeling. Memento mori. Slowly my childhood heroes will drift away until there's none left. Then it will be my turn to drift away.

I miss him already. The world is always going to be a little sadder without him. Though, maybe I can still make it to his party.

    A RECEPTION FOR TIME TRAVELLERS
    Hosted by
    PROFESSOR STEPHEN HAWKING
    To be held in the past, at
    THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE
    Gonville & Caius College, Trinity Street, Cambridge
    Location: 52˚ 12' 21" N, 0˚ 7' 4.7" E
    12:00 UT 28 JUNE 2009
    NO RSVP REQUIRED

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@imjustice 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@ivl 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Reading that headline it took me a moment. His books shaped my interest in science, and were wonderful to read and enjoy, even to push on family members. A monumentally inspiring person, not just for his scientific accomplishments, but also for how incredibly he handled the hand he was dealt.

He will be missed, dearly.

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@nilkn 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I think in the back of my mind I always thought of Hawking as being immortal. He lived for over 50 years with a debilitating terminal illness, and yet his accomplishments so vastly exceeded the capabilities of his body. It’s hard to believe he was capable of dying.

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@baby 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

This is a very sad day.

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@gurpreet- 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

A truly sad day for us all. He was a person who showed us that we can do amazing things even when we're up against debilitating diseases. He was an inspirational person who is up there with the greats and will be remembered for eons to come.

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@bitwize 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

76 years isn't a bad run, and it's amazing for someone with ALS (which also took my uncle a couple years ago). And he did much more with that time than most of us would even be able to countenance. He was a modern-day Einstein, in the sense that his tremendous contributions to science have made him the face of science itself in the public eye.

It's just like Hawking to check out on Pi Day.

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@ainiriand 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I will always remember him. And my future kids will know who a great human he was. Rest in peace Stephen.

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@cyberferret 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Oddly, this news struck me harder than other recent deaths of celebrity musicians that I was huge fans of. I guess Professor Hawking always had that aura of timelessness around him, and everyone just knew he was doing important work that would change humanity's understanding of the universe and our place in it.

It seems somehow unfair to have him taken away in the middle of all that.

EDIT: Fond memories of walking around Cambridge University two decades ago with my cousin, and she casually pointed to a building and said "Oh, Stephen Hawking works in there". Seemed so mundane to think that such important works were going on in some nondescript building that I just happened to be walking past. I always envisaged him working on a totally different plane from the rest of us mere peons.

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@pknerd 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Stephen Hawking was born on the date of Galileo's death, the 8th of January.

He has died on the date of Albert Einstein's birth, the 14th of March.

Source:- https://twitter.com/spectatorindex/status/973807157182332928

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@kposehn 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

This warrants the black bar.

He has changed everything for humanity time and again. We owe him the best future we can possibly make.

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@remarkEon 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

As a kid my first introduction to Hawking was on a Star Trek: The Next Generation episode.

This deserves a black bar. This man I’m sure inspired almost everyone here in some way. Odd to think he’s dead. I thought he’d live forever...

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@andrei_says_ 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I have never met this man and yet I feel deep loss and gratitude. I feel personally enriched by his life.

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@Abishek_Muthian 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Though part of me is glad that he's now relieved from the pain of existence, the other part wishes that he should've lived long enough for his conscious to be uploaded into a perpetual medium; to find answers for his questions.

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@propman 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

An inspiring role model in so many aspects, RIP to one of the greatest minds. I strongly believe that his perseverance through his circumstances is even more admirable than his research. It's so easy to become bitter and jaded when a shocking event like that occurs. At the best, you make peace and live as happy a life as you can...but to stand tall and rebuke Fate, defy all odds and even banish almost certain Death for decades through sheer willpower and passion for knowledge is something else. And to hold that tiny, bright flame against an unrelenting torrent for 55 years, always curious, always following his passion...the world lost one of the greats tonight.

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@sitkack 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I am not sad for him, I am sad for us.

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@timlianov 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

R.I.P. Stephen Thank you for all

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@eljimmy 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

If you haven't read it yet, give 'A Brief History of Time' a read. Even if you're not a big book reader, it's only about 250 pages. Great way to pay respects to this legendary man.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Brief_History_of_Time

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@zubairq 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

He was a true inspiration and showed how much we can be defined by our thoughts, not just our physical presence

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@k_sze 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I hope that he has actually transcended to some higher dimensions, joining other great minds like Einstein and Bohr, and that they are actually playing around with even more advanced forms of physics, peering into black holes and quarks like they were toys.

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@foobaw 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

R.I.P Stephen. He was such an inspiration to a lot of people and probably will be for a lot of people in the future.

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@c54 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙



@terlacious 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

An inspiration, pioneer, visionary and now a legend. The world is less brighter now that a star has left us on Earth.

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@aaachilless 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

It's really beautiful how the entire world [1] has in unison recognized the life of this great man. There's something uncanny, sort of cinematic, about the information of his death radiating out across the globe and "lighting" us up as we consider what an incredible human being he was.

[1] Maybe not the "entire" world, but all the news orgs I checked had news of his death on their front page as of 2-3 minutes ago:

Al Jazeera // CNN // Fox News // ABC (Australia) // France 24 // DW (Germany) // reddit // HN // NY Times // BBC // WaPo // the Guardian // the Japan Times // Xinhua (China)

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@ghostpirate 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

The world will always remember him even after centuries

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@abbiya 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Pi Day

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@scrollaway 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

The world will miss you, Stephen.

I'm going to rewatch Hawking tonight (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0395571/).

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@exodust 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

On his website I found this TED talk by Peter Diamandis where Hawking fulfils his dream of going to space on the zero-g aeroplane. He was 65 at the time.

They did several more parabolas than planned, 8-10 min of weightlessness each time. He loved it. Still images only, but it's great to see him out of his wheelchair and floating in space.

https://youtu.be/0VJqrlH9cdI

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@drawkbox 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

Sometimes the RNG of the Universe creates people with intelligence, innovation and insight that are one in a billion that make the world better than it was before in immense ways, Stephen Hawking is one of those mountain movers.

People like Stephen Hawking, Carl Sagan, Nikola Tesla and even Elon Musk today, that make us look up, innovate and think way out there, bring us together and remind us we are all on this planet together and can do amazing things if we choose to put our energy towards it.

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@newscracker 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

I liked the movie, "The Theory of Everything", which allowed for more people to learn about this phenomenal human being. [1] I also liked his appearances in shows (like The Big Bang Theory). We would've looked forward to a lot more from him! He will be missed!

[1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Theory_of_Everything_(2014...

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@soesoe1221 3 years

Replying to @Cogito 🎙

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa<>"'

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