Hacker News Re-Imagined

This is actually pretty explosive news. Several of the ongoing antitrust cases involving the tech giants would require a more relaxed definition than the current antitrust standard which necessitates linking direct consumer harm. This standard was established by a somewhat radical pro-free market court decision that reversed an earlier interpretation that viewed monopolies in and of themselves as a condition subject to antitrust litigation (without the direct consumer harm piece). The current definition poses an almost insurmountable challenge for regulators as all companies need to do in order to avoid meeting the statutory requirements for antitrust is to refrain from colluding and/or abusing their market dominant position (engaging in anti-competitive practices). It seems like Google and Facebook crossed that line in a pretty blatant way which is quite shocking considering they are fully aware of the consequences. They opened themselves up with this one in a way that could lead to their undoing. Crazy stuff.

  • 1 year ago

  • @dkobran
  • Created a post



@switch11 1 year

Replying to @dkobran 🗣

Yes, They also do a lot more than this

stuff like

astroturfing

click fraud

fake submissions on forms

etc

They basically operate completely recklessly

We are getting a lot of attacks from Google. I took screenshots just today of them doing fake submissions and they don't even hide it. From Google servers

*

Basically, their modus operandi is

A) Silent Agreement between Amazon, Google, Facebook and a few other companies (not sure which) to divide internet among themselves

B) Use any and all method to slow down any company growing fast

Usually this is 'plausible deniability' methods such as removing apps from app stores, kicking you off your payment processor, dropping you in organic search, shifting your adwords to 90% fake clicks, etc

C) If above methods don't work then they start using illegal methods i.e.

modifying search results when people search for you hacking attacks using gmail to hide your emails to customers and/or not deliver your invoices to new customers click fraud on other ad networks (Bing, etc) fake submissions

Contrast the HUGE number of enterprise side and B2B companies that are going public

now compare with how few customer to business companies are doing the same

*

It's not random

any customer facing company that is begining to do well has to face

Google disappearing them from Search Facebook disappearing them from Facebook and Instagram attacks from a few other Silicon Valley Companies

There is going to be A LOT of candy in the sofa

It's going to be Snowden level stuff

There will be a list of

Top 10,000 companies to kill off

and also

Top 500 threats

And there will be a playbook of all the methods to use to wipe them out

There will be even totally crazy stuff like

sending spy employees Trojen Horse VC Investments

etc

Reply


@slim 1 year

Replying to @dkobran 🗣

there's this related thread by Cory Doctorow from last week

https://mobile.twitter.com/doctorow/status/13368328196753162...

Reply


@MichaelMoser123 1 year

Replying to @dkobran 🗣

I suspect they regard themself as 'too big to fail', in the sense that they might think that the practical implications of such a breakup would deter anyone from even considering this scenario.

Reply


@JumpCrisscross 1 year

Replying to @dkobran 🗣

> Google and Facebook crossed that line in a pretty blatant way which is quite shocking considering they are fully aware of the consequences

If they're stupid enough to do this there's a lot more candy in the sofa.

Reply


@deathgrips 1 year

Replying to @dkobran 🗣

The case in the US would be around the market power of Facebook, Google and Amazon. That vertical merger case is being run by the Department of Justice’s antitrust division. The European Commission is also investigating the same three companies under its EU Merger Regulation rules. The EU competition enforcer has opened a case against Google for some e-commerce practices.

Reply


@dragonwriter 1 year

Replying to @dkobran 🗣

> It seems like Google and Facebook crossed that line in a pretty blatant way

Well, I mean, everything always seems blatant when you read the complaint in a lawsuit by itself.

OTOH, there's a reason that the legal system doesn't just take the complaint and decide based on that.

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