Hacker News Re-Imagined

Twitter rolls back AMP support, no longer sends users to AMP pages

  • 321 points
  • 2 hours ago

  • @twapi
  • Created a post
  • • 38 comments

Twitter rolls back AMP support, no longer sends users to AMP pages


@al_ak 16 minutes

Replying to @twapi 🎙

What happened to all the AMP defenders that used to flood the comment section?

Reply


@framecowbird 1 hour

Replying to @twapi 🎙

I'm happy to see AMP fade into irrelevance... What was the main driver of its decline? Why did Google stop aggressively pushing it?

Reply


@cphoover 1 hour

Replying to @twapi 🎙

Thank God AMP is dying...

If you are looking to develop a specification for preloading go through the browser standards process, instead of unloading this proprietary crap on the rest of us.

Reply


@kristianc 54 minutes

Replying to @twapi 🎙

AMP used to completely break the cookied login flow to paywalled sites. Thank god I’ll no longer now have to click to ‘Open in Safari’ to read content I actually pay for.

Reply


@joegahona 54 minutes

Replying to @twapi 🎙

I'm guessing this is related to Twitter's acquisition of Scroll, and the new Twitter Blue feature of sending Blue users to publisher sites with ads disabled. That was probably a nightmare to throw AMP into the mix with everything else that needs to be done.

Reply


@xchaotic 1 hour

Replying to @twapi 🎙

AMP made some technical sense to speed up page load but it’s proprietary nature and the available http3 and quic protocols mean that It’s high time to say goodbye to amp pages.

Reply


@tarkin2 6 minutes

Replying to @twapi 🎙

Did AMP achieve anything? (Aside from the whole everything in hosted by google thing) Wasn't the promise to make pages more responsive and lighter? I'm personally happy I dodged that bullet along with various other front-end fads.

Reply


@tyingq 1 hour

Replying to @twapi 🎙

Hopefully other sites that normally have a logged in experience will follow. The Reddit AMP experience is, uh...lousy. The end-user experience on news sites is fine for end users, but not great for the publishers. I suspect, though, they will take longer to move away...not a lot of capital around for them to spend on that.

I thought AMP was a trojan horse from the beginning. Happy to see it dying off.

Reply


@aelzeiny 48 minutes

Replying to @twapi 🎙

Honest question from someone completely oblivious to AMP. What problem was AMP trying to solve? "Make websites load faster" is a buzzword-flag to me, and it's not really explained in the wikipedia article [1]

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accelerated_Mobile_Pages

Reply


@nightpool 48 minutes

Replying to @twapi 🎙

I really liked AMP as a client side framework, and I think it had a lot going for it in terms of guiding you into a performant experience with good UX for mobile devices. Plus, the restrictions on floating elements and third party JavaScript have done a ton to improve ad quality on mobile web. I don't think we get there without Google or another similarly-powerful browser/aggregator coalition really working together to provide the right incentives to publishers.

Reply


@rezonant 1 hour

Replying to @twapi 🎙

Good riddance. AMP is terrible.

Reply


@pupppet 1 hour

Replying to @twapi 🎙

Let's keep this trend going!

Reply


About Us

site design / logo © 2021 Box Piper