Hacker News Re-Imagined

Ask HN: What book(s) did you love reading this year?

Inspired by [1], I considered my key reads of the year:

* Courage Is Calling by Ryan Holliday

* Post Corona by Scott Galloway

* Feck Perfuction by James Victore

What about you?

[1] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=29309758

  • 45 points
  • 7 days ago

  • @petecooper
  • Created a post
  • • 32 comments

Ask HN: What book(s) did you love reading this year?


@atmosx 5 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

I'd like to share the following:

- "Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind" by Yuval Noah Harari

I believe it is a pretty common book amongst the HN crowd, no need to expand over it.

- "The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?" by Michael Sandel

Currently reading this book. I find this book amazing. The arguments are well thought and the language is easy. I think Sandel is one of the top Philosophers of our time. Sandel, it seems, has a level of empathy that most well educated people are lacking. The topic of meritocracy interests me particularly, so I bought another book which is a meritocratic proponent "The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World" by Adrian Wooldridge. The two held a really interesting debate at intelligence squared ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOpdahGGoxE ) not long time ago.

- "The Burnout Society" by Byung-Chul Han

This book is hard, as most books by Mr Han. To a large extend the book is like a thesis: dense, technical vocabulary, etc. Those not too deep in modern psychology and philosophy, like myself, will find following through challenging but IMO the idea of the "self-slave" is extremely prominent in the tech industry.

Reply


@mikewarot 6 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern - Simon Winchester

Reply


@kristianp 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

I really enjoyed:

"Uprooted" by Naomi Novik.

The Man Who Solved the Market: How Jim Simons Launched the Quant Revolution by Gregory Zuckerman

Spoonbenders by Daryl Gregory

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@50 6 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

T.S. Eliot's Murder in the Cathedral.

Reply


@omosubi 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

I started reading classics this year and want to continue. Best i read was the histories by Herodotus - the first history book in the western tradition. Absolutely incredible and completely changed my view of the world. I wish I read read it a long time ago.

Also Atomic Habits by James Clear. I liked this one so much i outlined it myself after reading through it straight. I had never done that

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@foofoo4u 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Confessions of a Recovering Engineer by Charles Marohn, founder and president of Strong Towns. https://www.confessions.engineer/

I have also been enjoying my subscription to the [American Affairs Journal](https://americanaffairsjournal.org/) and, similarly, [National Affairs](https://www.nationalaffairs.com/subscribe).

Reply


@growthfunda 6 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

As there are many books to read, so this year I narrowed down my focus and I thought of reading a few side hustle books that will help. Actually I am running a blog on the Side hustle niche so the more I read, the more I can give to my audience. Here are the books that I read: 1: The One Thing 2. Eat that frog and other books that I loved reading are listed here: https://www.growthfunda.com/side-hustle-books/

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@barbarbar 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

I only managed one book this year.

Crime and Punishment - Dostoyevsky

I should try to not being so lazy and read more.

Reply


@tmaly 5 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

I really enjoyed The Almanack of Naval Ravikant

It has a good condensed summary of practical philosophy as well as a great list of books to check out for further ideas.

Being short on time, the summary was very helpful.

The Obstacle Is the Way by Ryan Holiday was a short high level description of some aspects of Stoic Philosophy. It opens the door to some of the classics.

The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle made me think a lot about being present, that the mind is apart from the consciousness.

Redirect by Timothy Wilson - I like that it is experimental based and debunks a lot of other stuff out there that has no basis for truth.

The Book of Life: Daily Meditations with Krishnamurti - reading this now, I really like the daily meditation format. It gives you something to think about.

Reply


@geoah 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Reamde by Neal Stephenson, Bandwidth by Eliot Peper, Accelerando by Charles Stross, in this order.

I enjoyed quite a few short stories and collections, “One day all this will be yours”, “forward collection”, “dispatcher”.

Books I really struggled with, “klara and the sun”, “snow crash”, “oryx and crake”.

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@fiftyacorn 6 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Merlin by Graham Hoyland

It's about the engineering of the Merlin airplane engine from the early days of rolls Royce thru to ww2

Reply


@shishy 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

* Ballad of the Bullet -- Forrest Stuart

* The Neapolitan Novels -- Elena Ferrante (4 book set, also a great HBO show adaptation!)

* Kitchen Confidential -- Anthony Bourdain (not sure why I hadn't read it till now... I was a huge fan of everything else Tony did)

- Currently reading 1000 Years of Joys and Sorrows -- Ai Weiwei

Reply


@vicky-08 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Non-Fiction

* A mind at play - Jimmy Soni, Rob Goodman

* Show the work - Austin Kloen

* The effective executive - Peter Drucker

Fiction

* The 7 and 1/2 deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle - Stuart Turton

Technical

* On Lisp - Paul Graham

Reply


@av3csr 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

* Snow Crash - Neal Stephenson

* Royal Tars: The Lower Deck of the Royal Navy - Brian Lavery

* SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome - Mary Beard

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@aestetix 6 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.

The Last Lion (Alone) by William Manchester.

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@dudul 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

I loved reading "Le Petit Prince" to my 6 yo son.

I was pretty young myself the last time I read it and I found the experience very different now that I'm on my 30s.

I've read somewhere that you're supposed to read this book 3 times in your life: as a kid, as a young adult and as an older person. Curious to see how it will feel like to read it in 30 years.

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@rmk 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Fiction

- Night Over the Solomons, Louis Lamour

A rollicking read of daring exploits of GIs in the Pacific Theater (fictional). Louis Lamour writes well; excellent light reading.

- Tales of the South Pacific, James Michener

Tales of quirky characters in the South Pacific, during wartime and after it. James Michener can spin a good yarn, and he totally immerses you in the place. I read Hawaii (and almost got to finishing it) and got on a Hawaii / Pacific kick a couple years ago. It is a surprisingly rich and enjoyable sub-genre of literature.

Non-fiction

They say truth is stranger than fiction. You couldn't find a better example than this tale set in Silicon Valley.

- Bad Blood, John Carreyrou

I'm late to the party, but better late than never. It shows how low seemingly ordinary people can stoop, but also, how high seemingly ordinary people can reach. It also is an example of how utterly ordinary our so-called leaders are.

Reply


@bwb 5 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

The Bruno Chief Of Police series, just fun stories about a cop in rural France. Really enjoyed them and made for some great reads.

Clash of Eagles Trilogy – I LOVED this series, such a cool concept, historical fiction but reimagined as if Rome survived into the 1200s and lands in Native America to face off against the Native Americans. Then, their nemesis the Mongols arrive on the other coast.

The Last Watch – Great space sci fi read. Book 2 wasn't quite as good, but looking forward to 3.

Eagles of the Empire Historical Fiction series - Imagine lethal weapon but with two fantastic characters in the Roman legion.

Reply


@paulkrush 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

My 3 Favorite this year: 418: I Am a Teapot by Edgar Scott Automatic Reload: A Novel by Ferrett Steinmetz Attack Surface by Cory Doctorow

After Meta I had to re-read: Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson

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@L0in 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

I haven't read as much as i wanted to but, from those i've read, i really liked "In Extremis: The Life of War Correspondent Marie Colvin"

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@Amy_W 21 hours

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

1. The Book of Mother By Violaine Huisman 2. Smell Detectives by Melanie Kiechle (https://ivypanda.com/essays/smell-detectives-by-melanie-kiec...)

Reply


@jason2323 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

1. Java Concurrency in Practice - Brian Goetz 2. Designing Data Intensive Applications - Martin Kleppman 3. Linux Kernel Development - Robert Love 4. Systems Performance - Brendan Gregg (reading this now actually)

Reply


@krueger71 6 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Fiction

- Three Body-trilogy, Cixin Liu

- The Children of Húrin, Tolkien

- The Silmarillion, Tolkien

- The Hobbit, Tolkien

- Lord Of The Rings-trilogy, Tolkien

- The Green Mile, Stephen King

Non-fiction

- Practical Vim 2nd ed., Drew Neil

- Pestens år: döden i Stockholm 1710, Magnus Västerbro

Reply


@cafard 5 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

History:

* Russia Leaves the War by George Kennan * The Battle Cry of Freedom by James MacPherson

Fiction:

* Hunger by Knut Hamsun * White Teeth by Zadie Smith

Philosophy:

* Philosophy of Logic by W.V.O. Quine * Modes of Being by Paul Weiss * Phenomenology, Its Genesis and Prospect by Quentin Lauer * Philosophy of Right by Hegel

Reply


@yongyongyong 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

The Burnout Society, The Transparency Society by Byung-Chul Han

Klara and the sun

Project Hail Mary

The Noonday Demon

Reply


@mrtedbear 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

Standouts for me were Klara and the Sun (Kazuo Ishiguro), Exhalation (Ted Chiang), Invisible Planets (an anthology of Chinese sci-fi short stories, translated by Ken Liu) and Longitude (Dava Sobel).

I also finally got around to reading Cixin Liu's Three Body series, and although not perfect, there's so many interesting ideas in them.

Reply


@xu3u32 7 days

Replying to @petecooper 🎙

You must be into podcasts? I enjoy listening to Ryan and Scott.

Reply


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