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Toxic culture is driving the great resignation

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  • 2 days ago

  • @Hard_Space
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  • • 356 comments

Toxic culture is driving the great resignation


@Zenst 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Would be interesting in comparing the number of employee's indicating a wish to leave the company with the level of customer churn.

My gut feeling is that there may well be a correlation there. As happy customers make a happy company and the company is more than any stock market or accountant realizes the value of the all employee's and not just the the board and PR faces. As customers interact with those employee's, whilst the financial markets interact with the figure-heads. Hence a difference in reality perspectives.

But no hard data, just a gut feeling that there may well be more too this that is quantifiable, maybe even formulaic. Though not an easy data set to put together than it seems as not easy to find out a companies churn rate. Which may explain why it may just stay a gut feeling theory.

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@mateo1 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

That is not real research. I'm disgusted that big names like mit stand behind buzzword-driven self-affirmative soft science bullshit publications like this.

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@fallingfrog 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

It may be that what we are seeing is an increasing realization that the interests of the boss or managerial layer are at odds with the interests of the ground level worker. People are starting to stand up for their own interests, which if you are the boss, is troubling, hence a lot of pearl clutching about how "nobody wants to work anymore".

Writ large, I think people are also realizing that the interests of the CEO/political/ruling class are also wildly at odds with their own interests as well- although we seem to be very susceptible to being distracted by superficial culture wars bullshit and shiny things at the moment.

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@andrewflnr 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

I've always guessed this was a major factor, though I still think too-low pay is a factor in a lot of cases, especially industries where pay tends to be anchored to minimum wage. However:

(a) This is public social media data, I guess? That seems like a noisy channel.

(b) Some of their suggestions are really dumb, and all miss the point in my view. If my boss is an ass, sponsoring a social event and expecting that to make things better is insulting.

The real solution theoretically doesn't have to cost any money: managers just have to be better people. For such famously bottom-line-driven organizations as large companies, it's funny how that zero-cost solution is so unlikely to actually happen.

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@foolfoolz 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

> Our analysis found that the leading elements contributing to toxic cultures include failure to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion; workers feeling disrespected; and unethical behavior

I don’t really believe these reasons or at least they don’t match what i’ve seen. I can only speak for FAANG: I think this is more compensation based than anything else.

In an effort to level the playing field FAANGS establish levels. Levels have salary ranges. Salary ranges mean top performers, the people who drive the culture of the entire org, can only be paid some amount more than bottom performers. By keeping these bands too tight the top performers can get better pay elsewhere and leave.

When your first top performers are leaving each one hits hard. Once it’s regular the culture becomes different, this isn’t a place to stay and grow, it’s a place to be a launchpad for the next place. And without top pay you won’t attract top talent so when these great people leave you replace them with average people. This reinforces the beliefs.

The other side of pay is current valuations are insane. Many startups are getting A, B and even D rounds with 300-500x (i’ve seen higher than 1000x) revenue to value ratios. Your FAANG may hope to 2x or 3x in stock value while these startups promise 20-30x returns. So you have to pay even more to beat the potential earnings they could get at a startup.

My theory is not that all pay has to change to keep people, but as a FAANG you need to spend to keep and attract the best or you risk losing everyone. When you work somewhere and all the best people want to stay, or when you work somewhere and more good people join; it’s really hard to mess up that culture

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@jokoon 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

When you add covid, climate, the antiwork movement, lack of social progress, political drama, something has to break.

There is high resentment towards capitalism and how it is being managed, and I'm not really surprised people are quitting like this, I don't even understand how can normal people hold all those jobs and deal with the stress etc.

Personally I think advocating for a general strike would help "shuffle the cards" again.

I really feel like 2008 "postponed" a political adjustment that should have happened but did not.

It's really weird to be chronically unemployed and watch this "great resignation" phenomenon.

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@mschuster91 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

What was the old saying? People don't flee jobs, they flee bad managers?

You can run a fast-food franchise, a pub, a hotel or any other front-line enterprise with skill and enjoy extremely loyal employees (at the cost of your profit), or you can run it like a hell on earth by extracting all profit you reasonably can.

For a long time, the latter was the standard model across the hospitality sector, especially as unionization and other forms of worker self-organization were never really present - now with covid haven thoroughly shaken everything up, employers are (finally) forced to up their offers. For a lot of them though, it might be way too late - good riddance.

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@djohnston 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

> Our analysis found that the leading elements contributing to toxic cultures include failure to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion; workers feeling disrespected; and unethical behavior.

Not that I don't believe this but I reallllly want to see the data and how they classify a company as promoting D&I Vs not.

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@jshaqaw 1 day

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

The great resignation is fascinating. Some people are trapped in jobs with toxic cultures because they really have obligations to meet and a lack of good alternatives. Lots of other people just think this is the case. A toxic manager with a certain kind of charisma (as many high level toxic managers ten to have)can project this fear into the susceptible and they use that power shamelessly. But this kind of fear projection seems to rely on actual physical proximity or at least spending lots of time in an environment that they not you control. It’s amazing how much less scary a jackass manager seems when you are working home in your sweatpants with some Louis Armstrong playing. Can only be good to defang these soul parasites a bit.

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@jessaustin 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

The industries with the highest percentage of blue-collar workers are noted in light blue.

This means the other industries with lower blue-collar percentages are noted in blue blue. This may be the dumbest graphic decision I've seen yet this year.

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@99_00 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

I think the 'Great Resignation' is fake news.

When COVID hit people felt insecure so they stayed on jobs they would have otherwise quit. Look at any graph of resignations or quits, they dipped. We are seeing the pent up desire to quit hit the market.

However, pent up desire to quit doesn't make as interesting a story. Writers and researchers can use the 'Great Resignation' narrative promote any agenda or attack any workplace philosophy they want. Then readers can argue about it endlessly. The fact that it's divorced from reality means the debate can't be resolved because the premise is flawed. Media companies and sites get an endless stream of engaging but useless content.

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@altabrams 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

I agree a toxic culture is probably driving the great resignation. I don't believe it is lack of money. I do believe and have experienced toxic work relationships and environments. I've had a career as a software engineer -15+ years-, and then shifted to security. Developers reflect their environment and are largely toxic individuals or the object of toxic teams. There is a love/hate relationship with Execs and Tech pros, and the salaries they demand. Execs are looking to cut costs, Tech is looking for career advancement and longevity. Developers are caught between these two rocks. Then the fear of outsourcing for a lower cost workforce. It sucks. The best advice I can give is to enjoy your work and don't get hung up on a $$ track as your measure of success. The $$ will work out in the end, you need to find relationships of like minded folks and support each others careers, boost each others ratings. Provide excellent customer service - the customers being those business owners of your development projects. Look for at least a cost of living increase, ask what needs to happen to get a raise. It's harder than you think. You have to not just produce cheerfully, but provide breakthrough solutions. It's always been a fact in the US that you have to perform the advanced role for at least a year before your title and compensation reflects it.

Cheers and good fortune~

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@iamtheworstdev 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

this is tangential maybe - but some of these industries are dominated by unions and really skew the data. Airlines for instance. No one leaves an airline unless they're quite literally at wits end and willing to go start all over at the bottom of the pay scale somewhere else.

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@dhjhdskjsdjkds 1 day

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

"Toxic culture is overstated" = "I've never sat down and had any serious work discussions with women in tech, but I think I know everything."

Toxic culture in engineering is terrible. I've been in many different engineering and IT work environments for decades, and have seen a ton of women get picked on and bullied, both overtly and just subtly. Yeah it's not all women--some evolve shields, some become passive and numb, some double down on skill to get 1x the credit for 2x the effort--but it's definitely very real.

I also think quitting has been driven by remote work. What happens if person A had remote work during the worst part of the pandemic, erratic petty tyrant boss A decides its time to "come back" or "go hybrid" even though it seems nonsensical to someone with broadband and a remotely accomodatable job--and then person B, who is spouse/friend/relative of person A, has a completely different situation where non-maladjusted boss B is like "yeah man, as long as you are getting your work done, I don't care where you do it."

There is a strong desire to dump "MadMen" type boss A with prejudice. Not always, some people love getting out of the house to work, but for people who enjoyed pandemic remote work, to have to give it up for arbitrary reasoning based on the armchair organizational psychology theories of some dumb manager--those people are going to skate, and they should.

It's like one the one side you have this vague meme of "in person team building" and on the other, real costs like: car wear and tear costs, gas costs, mass transit costs, parking costs, weather related time costs like scraping, increased accident risk from commute, lost work time during commute, different/specialized clothing needs and uncomfortable work clothing standards, prep/logistics time like packing/unpacking/undocking/docking, MBWA/wanderer interruptions and ad hoc "coworker therapist sessions" in the office, less comfortable and ergonomically genericized desks and peripherals, uncontrollable environmental noises and temperatures...all to do something that can be done over a wire.

I'd sooner set an office building on fire than work out of it. I'm a genXer and I guess I get why boomers are like this but if you're my age or younger and you force people into an office, shame on your pathetic fake nerd soul.

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@throwaway9952 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

My company recently had a series of townhalls related to a re-org that included a few different open Q&A sessions. I'd estimate that 70-80% of the questions related to what the company was going to do to address current salaries, particularly vis-a-vis inflation. The questions were largely deflected (which is probably okay given the context) but there is very little urgency to do anything outside of the normal review cycle.

Attrition is starting to get bad and I don't really see what harm there is in doing something off-cycle. There is effectively a black-swan event going on where you have record-high inflation coupled with low unemployment and a substantially more demand for workers than there is supply. The move to remote has also shifted the opportunities for tons of folks who lived outside of major urban hubs, allowing them opportunities that were never previously available to them. Why wouldn't such a rare event result in rare proactivity?

I've changed jobs twice since the pandemic hit, resulting in about a 50% increase in compensation. I'm almost certain to change jobs again soon and will then be closer to doubling my salary from where I was in March 2020. In none of these job changes have I seen any serious plans by the companies to address salaries with a broad brush.

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@imgabe 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

> Workers are 3.8 times more likely to leave Tesla than Ford

I wonder how much of this is culture and how much is that Tesla employees are more likely to have gotten rich off their stock compensation in the past 2 years.

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@UIUC_06 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Wokeness alert! Did some censor insert this phrase after the rest of the article was written?

"the leading elements contributing to toxic cultures include failure to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion"

and yet there is no other mention of "diversity" anywhere in the article, and no surveyed person mentioned it.

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@pw262 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

I work as a consultant at a company that has had their entire programming/system staff resign over the last year. Most of the replacement staff have now also resigned. The reason is toxic management. When people are facing life/death consequences from Covid it puts shit at work into perspective. Enough already!

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@itsdrewmiller 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Their estimate of turnover by industry clearly has an average around 10%, but quit rates this year should mean that the average turnover is more like 30%. They limit themselves to the 500 biggest employers or whatever the Culture 500 is, but I sincerely doubt there is that big of a discrepancy in turnover between big companies and small.

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@sheepybloke 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

There's a lot of talk of compensation here, but I do think it's more connected to toxic work culture. I left my job in March after my company aimed to lay off 25% of its workforce after the pandemic hit. It was hard, because while our revenues dropped substantially, we had just made huge profits the previous year. I understood the reasons why they wanted to cut, but it just felt reactionary and not forward looking, especially when we had a couple big projects on the way. Add in a couple of years of feeling like I wasn't getting recognized for my performance and the realization that I was probably going to be put into an overworked code monkey position, I decided it was time to move on. I think this is much more like what people are feeling now than just a thirst for more money.

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@tomohawk 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

This is based on comments people are willing to put in Glass Door, so there will be obvious biases there.

Publicly, people will make up a reason for leaving, and not state the real reason, or just not say anything.

I know a number of people who are just DONE with with covid culture, and just want to get away from it. The only way they can do that in many cases is to just leave their job. Since they are trying to get away from covid culture, the last thing they're going to do is talk about it on a site like Glass Door.

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@momoneyfool 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

I'm one of these people. I switched 2 jobs last year.

I work as a public trust system engineer for a SaaS vendor. We served police, fire, ems training systems. The local job was paying $70k. Low, but the job was easy, management was good, people I worked with were pretty awesome. Management actually told us that they were looking at a VC firm. a year before doing it. Never heard of anyone doing that before. Again, the company had very low toxic behaviors. Stability also has a worth.

The company got in bed with a VC. Worst choice ever. Then last year, the ownership was traded like a shiny pokemon card to another VC firm to add to another asset. Company culture flipped in an hour. Was announced on a Tuesday. I started interviewing the end of the week - I wanted to give it a chance to see if it was as bad as my initial gut reaction. And it was.

While I'm looking elsewhere, my pay got cut. Glassdoor shows similar previous acquisition bullshittery. Whatever. I'm done here.

I found a place. Similar role. Pay goes from 70k->120k. Sweet. Job looked interesting. I accept. And holy shit that place was toxic. "That's soo gay" was explained by my direct report as acceptable since he has 2 gay brothers <cringe>... on my 3rd day. Retard was casually thrown around, as was a whole lot of other stuff. Lest to say, that aint worth 120k.

So I hang my shingle again. I eventually found a system engineering position that pays 150k (?!?). I quit 0 notice with a lengthy email explaining why (effectively social justice reasons).

I'm now at the new role, and my salary jumped from 70k->150k in a span of a month.

Good work is a balance of total compensation, good co-workers, good managers, and stability (of your position, the team, and the company). When even one of those go bad, that whole calculus gets turned upside down. And combined with no more pensions and companies who don't care too much about people, yea, the best decision I can make is "GTFO". (Yes I'm a millenial)

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@xiphias2 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

There's nothing black swan in an inflationary environment that leads to hyperinflation, even if it's for a country with a reserve currency.

Every empire hyperinflated itself in the past, people just ignore history and how returning to sound money is inevitable.

The only black swan part is that now we have a better alternative to gold.

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@toss1 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Toxic culture indeed!

Saw a very interesting bit of a talk yesterday, using how Seal Team 6 selects the team - two axes, Performance and Trustworthiness, and a grid, High/Medium/Low for each axis.

Obviously no one wants the lower left corner of low performance and low trust and everyone wants the High of both values.

But it really turns out that you will NOT want even the best performer with low trustworthiness — a very average performer with high trust is a better choice.

The problem in large organizations is that they have many methods and metrics to measure performance, and almost none to measure trustworthiness.

I've for decades observed that large organizations seem to actively filter-in and select for sociopathic tendencies at the top; there are only a few, ad seemingly by happenstance, who I'd rate high on the trustworthiness and ethical scale.

This talk made the mechanism immediately apparent -- all the selection is for performance, and there is little to no selection for trustworthiness. Fro trust, there's only a few rails that seem to resemble 'don't get caught breaking the law'.

Of course, when high-performance/low-trustworthy individuals get to the top, they are not going to institute or support systems to select for high-trust.

So, organizations will tend to ratchet in the sociopathic direction. And, sociopaths at the top can barely do anything but create a toxic culture.

Now we see the results: MIT studies show results "consistent with a large body of evidence that pay has only a moderate impact on employee turnover...In general, corporate culture is a much more reliable predictor of industry-adjusted attrition than how employees assess their compensation."

This correlates with many other studies I've seen that people to not really leave bad pay, but bad management, and often in particular, bad managers.

And now, the measurement of only performance and not trust has made toxic cultures endemic, and — surprise — nobody wants to work there.

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@kerneloftruth 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Retail is where the greatest churn is happening -- and it makes perfect sense. Between shutdowns, layoffs, having to enforce mask rules on customers, having to deal with customers, smash and grabs,... retail seems like one of the worst job experiences to have, and with shaky job stability.

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@cjbgkagh 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Perhaps I’ve been unlucky but my experience at big tech has been marred by churn and burn culture - high pressure tactics to get the most work out of employees and discarding them when they inevitably burn out. Average tenure was 1-3 years. Amazon was particularly bad at this. The only modicum of power employees have is in quitting and now that they’re exercising it the employers are acting like their throats have been cut.

Edit: a story I like to tell people about what it’s like to deal with Big Co. is that I solo built a $50Mp.a. profit data science artifact in my first year. They offered me the highest once off bonus on offer $30K stretched over 6 years, no promotion (those were used to keep US citizens). I said, give me the same bonus as my manager for for ‘managing’ my project ~$150K in one year or I’ll quit. They said no so I quit. The artifact was extremely difficult to build and written in Scala, it took a lot out of me, no one understood it after I left. They rewrote it in Java which made it even harder to understand. It atrophied over 5 years and now it doesn’t even work at all. I’m in contact with my former colleagues and keep offering to fix it for 7 figures, but no dice. They’ve now convinced themselves it is impossible to do. That’s how committed they are to maintaining the status quo.

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@Kalanos 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

I was originally interested in business because I thought it would be a meritocracy. It's just a ladder-climbing suck fest where whoever rocks the boat lest and kisses the most butt wins.

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@bArray 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

> We also analyzed the free text of more than 1.4 million Glassdoor reviews, using the Natural Employee Language Understanding platform developed by CultureX, a company two of us (Donald and Charles) cofounded.

People go to a complaints website to complain, don't be surprised if you find complaints. The fact that large numbers of people are moving jobs means that large numbers of people suddenly feel empowered to complain. It's not necessarily cause and effect.

The word 'toxic' itself is not really well defined. It just means polluted or poisoned - it offers no incite as to what the unexpected addition is. If you crawl the reviews and find the word 'bad', is 'badness' a leading cause of employees leaving? How can 'badness' be addressed?

The article then pushes their interpretation of what they believe toxicity to be. In my opinion, toxicity is not usually something that can be well defined, hence the use of the word. Generally though it appears to be the feeling that other colleagues make the day-to-day experience worse. This could be a boss that gives you a hard time all the time, colleagues that talk behind about each other in negative ways, the feeling that your colleagues are your opposition and not your allies, etc. It appears to be bad inter-colleague relationships.

If you want to build up better inter-colleague relationships, the solution is not to introduce remote work where they simply avoid each other. Whilst initially it may work (less conflicts), it only serves to isolate staff and strengthen cliques. You need to build up morale, get them working together, have positive work-based experiences together, social events, etc. Go back to basics.

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@deepsquirrelnet 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Another swing and miss.

I don't think this is so hard. The pandemic is waking people to the reality of their own mortality.

Suppose you're working a job in a big, highly dysfunctional organization. Most of us who have been there know that these jobs often pay well -- but in trade, you're selling your precious hours to execute a random series of essentially meaningless events (and under pressure to get it done).

Now add a pandemic. You were probably already having a quiet existential crisis, feeling that the insanity of your work environment is no way to let your life pass by. You want your life to mean something, but it isn't fulfilling. Now, people you know are passing away much sooner than expected. Thoughts about the eventuality of your own death are really tipping the scales.

Do you just bury your nose and keep going on? Or find out what else is out there?

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@irthomasthomas 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

What I dont understand about The Quittening is where are these people going? Did they die, or retire, or change career, or went self employed? People don't just walk away from a 6 figure career and vanish. Where are they now?

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@rkangel 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

This article does accidentally capture one of the major corporate problems pretty well. The conclude from their data that Toxic Workplace Culture is the biggest cause of resignation, and then they immediately suggest 4 short term things to try that don't relate to culture at all.

If you have a toxic workplace culture, the very first thing you should do is to start fixing your culture. This is very hard and not fast (as they acknowledge to be fair). One thing you can do though is to acknowledge it to your employees - "X, Y and Z is wrong and we're working to fix it". Nothing destroys morale more than employees being unhappy about a set of things and then management standing up and telling you there aren't any problems.

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@rob_c 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

It's the inference that it sucks more to be a coder on average than asking "do you want fries with that?". I'm a little suspicious. It still looks closer to there is some great personal demand, or philosophical divide forming...

A huge factor is also the options open to the individual, which for a talented person in a skilled sector tends to be much better than someone working as a burger flipper.

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@oxymoran 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

“Not surprisingly, companies with a reputation for a healthy culture, including Southwest Airlines, Johnson & Johnson, Enterprise Rent-A-Car”

I find it hard to believe anything in the article when it notes that Enterprise has a reputation for healthy culture…it’s a bunch of former frat boys who think they are salespeople but are really just sleazy con artist. And the you have to wear a white shirt and tie whilst cleaning out and washing vehicles. Also pretty misogynistic atmosphere in some of the branches. Worst place I ever worked.

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@lmilcin 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Really?

First rule of asking about why somebody left a job is that people tend to first make the decision and then rationalise it. They will tell a lot of interesting stories about toxic culture and whatnot where in fact the reason might be they wanted to get a raise but their boss did not think they deserved it. It would be interesting to see how many people actually admitted it.

And reality is that most people that recently changed jobs of their own volition did this to a) keep working remotely and b) get better salary. Because they f-n can.

Especially in software development I have seen drastic increase in salaries. You see the offers increase practically daily. What I thought was a very good salary, in the span of less than a year became bottom of the bottom of the ranges I am receiving.

Most of companies are absolutely unwilling to increase salary for their employees. This is f-n stupid because people will find out at some point that their new colleagues with fraction of their experience have been hired for 2 or 3 times their salary.

It has already been a standard that it is easier to get a better salary by changing jobs rather than trying to beg your company to move it by more than inflation. Now that people have gotten used to it they stopped feeling any remorse about it and actually expect to leave the company in a year or two when they can get better salary. Why beg your boss when you are almost certain you can earn more with your two additional years of experience?

It is now socially acceptable to quit your job after a year or two and a lot of people no longer even considers actually trying to do a better job because their plan is to just change it. Why work your ass off when you are guaranteed a raise anyway? Hence the rise of "performative work" that has been described here some time ago. https://www.economist.com/business/2022/01/08/the-rise-of-pe...

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@H8crilA 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

Aren't the same factors driving resignations always, not just during the so called Great Resignation?

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@pcthrowaway 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

> "This finding is consistent with a study of 28 Gap stores, in which employees at randomly-assigned locations received their work schedules two weeks in advance, and their managers were barred from canceling their shifts at the last minute. Employees in the control stores were subject to the usual scheduling practices."

I don't even know what to say to this. The idea that big corp is intentionally fucking with their blue-collar workers who are likely to be living paycheck-to-paycheck, sleep deprived, or struggling to balance multiple jobs / school and job, just to study how it impacts employee retention, is baffling to me. This should be outright illegal (if it's not already).

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@indymike 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

This article is leaving out a factor that helping every company presented as being less affected by the great resignation: workforce age. Companies that have an older workforce generally have less turnover.

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@Areading314 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

A huge problem with this industry is the inflexibility to pay current engineers LARGELY increasing comp each year. The thought is that there is a market rate for an engineer and that pay can increase with the market rate, but this is a fallacy. An engineer that has been at a largish company for 1 year is worth 20-30% more than the year they were hired because they have specific knowledge of the tech stack. Yet that engineer will likely be offered a 3-5% raise. An engineer with 3+ years might be worth 50%+ because they have developed the specific skills relevant to the job AND know the idiosyncacies about org politics and the nitty gritty parts of the codebase. Yet they will still only get a 10-15% raise. So that engineer moves on and accepts a 40% raise elsewhere. And thus we see the constant churn of highly talented engineers which is a huge drain on productivity for all involved.

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@trabant00 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

> failure to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion

I have a very hard time believing this is the major driving factir in the "great resignation". Or maybe my Europe environment is completely different. But to me this sounds like another attempt to push certain political views and not at all to really discover what is going on.

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@kkjjkgjjgg 2 days

Replying to @Hard_Space 🎙

One thing I don't get: don't people need money? Is there a huge wave of poverty and homelessness rolling in after the Great Resignation?

I get IT workers may have earned so much that they will be OK for a while, but the article specifically mentions other jobs like food workers.

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