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The impact of sexual abuse on female development: a longitudinal study

  • 295 points
  • 8 days ago

  • @PaulHoule
  • Created a post

The impact of sexual abuse on female development: a longitudinal study


@Ozzie_osman 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

I think I remember reading (maybe in the book WEIRD) that in Western societies, as the "rule of law" spread and as society became more individualistic overall, murders shifted from being between strangers or weak acquaintances (ie a dispute, a robbery, etc) to being intrafamily (ie killing a spouse, parent, etc). Ie 200 years ago, it was unheard of, but now most murders are like that.

Abuse might be different, I couldn't find data (and im guessing that data on abuse would be harder to find than on murders).

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@agumonkey 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

If anybody knows studies on the neurological impact of sexual abuse very early on, feel free to spam me :)

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@derbOac 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

Study of this topic is critical, but designs of this sort are useless without biometric controls (for example, twin or family or genomewide marker controls).

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@blunte 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

Am I misunderstanding this, or is there a word missing from a key sentence in the abstract?

"There was also a pattern of considerable within group variability."

How does this get published with an obvious mistake in the abstract?

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@jl6 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

Violence against women and girls is endemic, and the scale is shocking. We must do everything possible to promote safeguarding and protect womens spaces.

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@ejiwgnalsocn 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

[trigger warning]

I'm a woman. I was physically and sexually abused by my father as a child. The impact it's had on me is painful to describe. I was working as a software engineer in the tech industry and was constantly experiencing PTSD symptoms being surrounded by men -- though by no fault of their own, it was totally because of what my father did to me.

It's been a frustrating journey. The sexual abuse happened to me at such a young age that I didn't realize until now, in my 30s, that I was molested. I feel completely robbed of my life -- to feel constant panic, anxiety, and depression for no fault of my own. It's been an expensive journey of therapy and various treatments to try to reach a stabilizing baseline. It's been an embarrassing journey -- as a software engineer, I am extremely competent. I just cannot work with men, apparently..

I'm glad studies like this are coming out to validate experiences of fellow incest survivors. A book instrumental in my understanding and healing also: The Body Keeps Score.

Thanks to whomever read this. I wrote it mostly to experience sharing my story publicly, and reducing to myself the shame that exists of being a child abuse survivor.

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@nazgulnarsil 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

To everyone who attempts to engage with this problem with a clear head despite the emotional difficulty of doing so: thank you. There's a lot of talk of making the world better in the silicon valley sphere, good for it to touch the concrete of what we're up against.

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@fullstop 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

I'm interested in this, but find it very difficult to read because of the topic.

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@fractallyte 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

If you, or anyone you love, has been affected by rape or sexual abuse, I highly recommend this book: https://ninaburrowes.com/books/the-courage-to-be-me/

It's the only comic/graphic-style book to address this topic in a practical, sensitive way - a groundbreaking book!

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@PaulHoule 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

There are many men who suffer through sexless marriages for 20, 30 years or more because their partner was victimized as a child. (I'd assume that some women also have similar problems because their man was abused.)

Such a man can work really hard to please and love a woman and try to create feelings of safety. They might blame themselves, thinking that it's because of that argument they had this morning, or yesterday, or last week, or two years ago, or the time the bed collapsed when they were having sex 25 years ago. But no, the woman doesn't feel safe because of something that happened 40 years ago that didn't have anything to do with them. The need for safety is a bottomless pit. Maybe the woman sees that the man is trying really hard and fakes a response but it's not real and the man sees that and it never blossoms into real mutual satisfaction.

It' s completely frustrating because the woman has adjusted well to being asexual. Perhaps she could struggle through three years of therapy to attempt to change, but it is unlikely to be effective because she's not doing it for herself. The man, on the other hand, might be willing to plumb the depths of hell or storm the gates of heaven to change things but it's pushing on a string.

(If the man has been traumatized by child bullying and subsequent sexual invisibility, rejection and being shut out from dating in high school they can be re-traumatized continuously by this demonstration that they are unlovable.)

I was reading about how the actor Danny Masterson had drugged and raped women, stealing their sexuality not just from them but from their partners. Thus a single act of abuse affects not just the direct victim but their lovers, their children, and many others in the community.

In the past two years we've seen a normalization of doing things over video and there has been an explosion in things like camgirling and OnlyFans -- many of the performers are people who had their sexuality distorted by abuse and I'm sure than many of the men who become victims of it (paying $1000 for a jar of farts, spending $80 for an Aella video) have themselves been victimized ) or are suffering because their partner or potential partners were abused.

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@Thoreandan 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

mods: (2011) should be added to title.

Professors Noll & Trickett have published more recent work as of 2016 (Trickett passed away that year.)

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@tomcam 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

Can testify it does a number on male development too

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@baggygenes 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

Fascinating and important study, but I have a hard time understanding how they missed a blatant spelling error in the abstract...

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@wffurr 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙



@Karawebnetwork 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

Appendix A summarizes all the findings reported in this paper:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3693773/#A...

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@gadders 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

I had a quick skim of the report. This so fucking sad. Figure 3 is heartbreaking.

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@throw8932894 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

I seen study[1] that claimed similar results (early puberty, depression...) but from lack of male figures in childhood. Another study showed similar results in macaque monkeys. Evolutionary explanation was that group needs to be repopulated faster.

[1] https://news.berkeley.edu/2010/09/17/puberty/

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@drewpc 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

The ways the research team engaged the study participants over 23 years is admirable, creative, and fascinating to understand.

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@ars 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

This is troubling for the statistical validity of this:

"At the time of study entry, comparison families were not informed that the study involved sexually abused females; rather, they were told that the study was of “female growth and development.” At the end of the initial interview, however, caregivers were told that the study pertained to sexual abuse"

If you tell people you are surveying a particular thing, they are more likely to report things in line with what you are expecting.

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@sandworm101 8 days

Replying to @PaulHoule 🎙

I find this to be the most telling stat:

"In a few cases (N < 5) families were dropped from the comparison group because some history of sexual abuse was ascertained."

So roughly 5% (<5 of 84) of the control group were discovered to have themselves been abused and needed to be dropped from the study. I was once in a law lecture on medical ethics. We were discussing genetic testing of newborns and how this could detect incest/abuse. A medical doctor in the class was dead against such testing. In his experience, amongst pregnant teenagers (17 and younger) about 10% were pregnant by their own fathers/brothers. His opinion was that our society is not ready to deal with this, that such abuse is far more common than anyone is willing to admit. He actually said: You better build some more prisons before you start testing babies for this. The OP study seems in line with his numbers.

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