Hacker News Re-Imagined

Namecheap: Russia Service Termination

Just received this email:

Dear XXXX,

Unfortunately, due to the Russian regime's war crimes and human rights violations in Ukraine, we will no longer be providing services to users registered in Russia. While we sympathize that this war may not affect your own views or opinion on the matter, the fact is, your authoritarian government is committing human rights abuses and engaging in war crimes so this is a policy decision we have made and will stand by.

If you hold any top-level domains with us, we ask that you transfer them to another provider by March 6, 2022.

Additionally, and with immediate effect, you will no longer be able to use Namecheap Hosting, EasyWP, and Private Email with a domain provided by another registrar in zones .ru, .xn--p1ai (рф), .by, .xn--90ais (бел), and .su. All websites will resolve to 403 Forbidden, however, you can contact us to assist you with your transfer to another provider.

Customer Support, Namecheap

  • 1735 points
  • 4 months ago

  • @exizt88
  • Created a post

Namecheap: Russia Service Termination


@cryptoegorophy 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

To add more to this, you can bypass their 2factor. This alone told me more about their service than anything.

Reply


@nirui 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

It is another thing if the decision was made due to notice from your government. Otherwise, as a Chinese and someone pretty pissed off by what Putin did (not just recently in Ukraine, he is been crazy long before that), I'm sorry, this decision is beyond stupid.

Imagine a Russian kid just done protecting, escaped the police assert and got this email on their way home, how they would feel? The word is probably Betrayed.

I'm not a customer of Namecheap and I don't know the rationale behind it. But if the Russian government or oligarchs are using your service, maybe ban them directly. Not all Russian are pro-war. Your passionate sanction will just make the life of regular Russians harder and push them to the very authoritarian government that they might disagree with, simply because it's the only government willing to treat them more fairly.

One funny story: Awhile back I've read a discussion about US sanctions against China on an underground Chinese website. One of the funny reply said something like "In the end this website will shutdown probably not due to crackdown, but because the owner cannot pay for the hosting fee from their Chinese credit card".

I hope the company reconsider it.

Reply


@mkulgin 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I paid for a domain with you for a year. Transferred to another registrar, and the money stayed with you. Can I consider that you just stole my money? Covering yourself with beautiful slogans? All of us here are against the war, but you are acting like marauders.

Reply


@gigatexal 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

In most governments that work where people can affect change these kinds of squeezes and the sanctions might even lead to a coup or real change ... but what I know about Russia is that Putin's grasp on power is so iron-clad that nothing will change. This only hurts innocent bystanders.

Nobody wins in a war only the arms dealers do.

Reply


@bitxbitxbitcoin 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Interesting… Russian users of their Handshake tlds, too is what I am reading.

Prime example of the risk associated with using a centralized entity.

At the same time, a bold and clear move.

Reply


@jbarham 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I have 30+ domains registered w/ Namecheap. I recently bought an ebook about UI design from a Russian. And I'm a longtime customer of JetBrains. While JetBrains is officially based in Prague (Czech Republic) I understand that many/most of their employees are in Russia. Similarly Namecheap is officially based in Arizona but many (most?) of their employees are in the Ukraine.

I'm definitely ambivalent about this move from Namecheap. I'd be curious to know whether this decision was made unilaterally by Namecheap's US-based CEO or whether it was pushed by their Ukrainian employees.

While Namecheap are understandably angry about the Russian invasion of Ukraine, I'm skeptical that cutting of their Russian customers will do anything to help Ukraine. If anything it will only cause Namecheap to lose revenue and thereby force them to cut jobs in their Ukrainian based workforce. Long term it also creates reputational risk for Namecheap as a company that makes decisions based on short-term political factors.

Requiring Namecheap's Russian customers to transfer their domains to another registrar in the next week is also easier said than done given the financial sanctions against Russia will probably make it much more difficult for them to pay for transferring the domains to a different registrar. I think it's safe to say that the average tech-savvy Russian is probably more anti-Putin than the average Russian as they have to jump through hoops and mess w/ VPNs to access western based services such as Twitter etc. So in practice this move might lead to de facto censorship and loss of income for their Russian customers, many of whom would be against the war.

Reply


@Hudoybergan 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

War should not be about issues outside of war. Even Rome accepted enemy athletes into the Olympics.

Reply


@RomanPaulov 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm Russian. I've been doing everything I can (legally and peacefully) to protest against the regime here for last 10 years. I participated in protests, fought with propaganda on social networks, talked with my friends and relatives who watch TV a lot and showed them a different point of view. Yep, it's clearly that it wasn't enough — the regime is still here. Right now I feel screwed. My mates who just left the country for good and obtained EU\US\etc residence permits have no problems right now, but me, who tried to do something to change what's happening in my country, have problems.

Reply


@smdz 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

A video from 6 years ago that pretty much predicted what is happening, and why it's not as straightforward as it is made out to be https://youtu.be/JrMiSQAGOS4

Reply


@bsd44 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Let the politicians play politics. It's bad for business when companies decide to do that. Namecheap might have only a handful of Russian customers to afford to do that, but this won't affect just them. It will affect everyone else who will now think twice about trusting their business with Namecheap, because what's stopping Namecheap to do the same thing in the future but for a different reason? Once you cross the Rubicon, there's no going back.

Reply


@hinkley 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I can't see how this road we are on with private companies engaging in what used to (supposedly) be affairs of estate possibly, ever, come back to bite the US on the ass.

Either the retaliation or other people deciding that what's good for the goose is good for the gander. Nope. Never happen. This is a good idea that will have no repurcussions.

Reply


@savaof 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Namecheap CEO from your second letter we can see that: 1. you really think that business taxes do mean something for Putin. It is totally wrong. Business in Russia exists ONLY against the government, with It's 20% and decreasing share (it is far less than in any democratic country). Putin gets his money from government run companies and he makes everything to raise their share. There are 2 reasons for him to do this: it is much easier and predictable to deal (steal) with those big companies and it is much easier to brainwash and control people, working there. And you must know that opposition financing goes from small independent businesses. If you want the proves - here they are: when Magnitsky sanctions were made against concrete people, Putin, as an answer restricted import of many goods, hurting and killing many businesses, and, therefore people. «All I wanna say he doesn’t care about us» So, acting like this you obviously help regime.

2. living in USA you think that sanctions is the way. this is the cowards' position, isn't it? instead of talking and acting with Putin himself you hurt innocent people and their families. Doesn't it look very like on his actions? Sitting in the safe underground bunker, sending missiles to civilian houses?

If you think your actions will help people start hating Putin - Not. We all hate him, suffer and willing peace. I must remember you that hundreds of thousands people united against him, leaded by Navalny, but many was poisoned, dozens are killed, thousands jailed. The opposition power was not enough, if enough Putin was defeated, isn’t it? I don't ask you where have you been when regime fighters died. It was not your war. But I ask you now - are the actions you make support the fight? How you refuse from couple of dollars will help opposition to raise again? If you want to help - send addressed money to fighters. And make it public. We have enough strong people, but the lack of resources is critical, because of the dumb sanctions idea. And the Serbian man, upthere in the comments, told you that they put down the regime only when people could accumulate resources to do that.

Help us, not Putin.

Reply


@n00p 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Nice, now do Saudi Arabia and UAE

Reply


@lenkite 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Wow, Putin will love this. He doesn't even need to build a Great China Firewall. Corporates will do the job free for him.

Reply


@NamecheapCEO 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

We haven't blocked the domains, we are asking people to move. There are plenty of other choices out there when it comes to infrastructure services so this isn't "deplatforming". I sympathize with people that are not pro regime but ultimately even those tax dollars they may generate go to the regime. We have people on the ground in Ukraine being bombarded now non stop. I cannot with good conscience continue to support the Russian regime in any way, shape or form. People that are getting angry need to point that at the cause, their own government. If more grace time is necessary for some to move, we will provide it. Free speech is one thing but this decision is more about a government that is committing war crimes against innocent people that we want nothing to do with.

Reply


@cbracketdash 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Russian citizens should not suffer for their political leaders' decisions.

Citizens should be held accountable to their own actions.

Reply


@hurflmurfl 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Great, now amid looking for ways to get my family out I also have to find another registrar who will not do the same thing and transfer my domains so that my cloud and email are still working.

Any politically neutral registrars that HN crowd can recommend?

Reply


@Gwarzo 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is a meaningless change done for the CEO/CTO's personal ego and/or PR.

This does absolutely zero to affect what is going on. ZERO.

Reply


@k7n 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

If you're having trouble with the Auth Codes being incorrect during the transfer, make sure you copy them from the unformatted original e-mail (Show Original in Gmail). The codes in the HTML e-mail are unescaped, so could cut off or mangle part of the code when rendered as HTML.

Reply


@slig 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Now they've painted a target on their back (just like Epik). Let's see how long until someone leaks their data.

Reply


@sudosysgen 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm just wondering, will you apply this standard fairly to all countries? This is of course a strong argument, and if you do, I will in admiration.

However, if you are going to apply it selectively, it's not nearly as impressive.

Otherwise, if you are doing it because your country is at war with Russia, that is much better justification and is commendable.

Reply


@faangiq 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Bro just build your own internet.

Reply


@gcj 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

An American company punishing citizens for their country's crimes is the most stupid, naïve and self righteous thing I've ever seem.

Go ahead and to the same to the rest of clients who are citizens of war criminal countries.

Good luck with the 15 remaining users.

Taking my shit out of Namecheap too.

Brazilian citizen here.

Reply


@mikl 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

> Additionally, and with immediate effect, you will no longer be able to use Namecheap Hosting, EasyWP, and Private Email with a domain provided by another registrar in zones .ru, .xn--p1ai (рф), .by, .xn--90ais (бел), and .su. All websites will resolve to 403 Forbidden.

What a dick move. Turning off services without warning is a brutal move, and taken against customers singly based on where they’re located is completely unjustified. At least give people some time to move away.

I wouldn’t trust Namecheap with my business after this. Who knows which customers their CEO will randomly decide to terminate without warning next?

Reply


@jacquesm 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Every Russian citizen and every Russian company that is currently relying on businesses in the West such as Amazon, Google, Microsoft and so on should expect those services to be cut off at some point in the near future.

Regardless, you won't be able to pay for these services so it will be terminated one way or another.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=30508314

(which was flagged, unfortunately).

Reply


@uwuemu 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

All the BS aside, the only thing I have problems with is "with immediate effect". If the customer didn't break your ToS or existing laws and pays you, you are OBLIGATED to continue the service. If you don't, that's called stealing and it's a scumbag thing to do. (I'm not even going to mention the substantial time and money investment a typical host change takes.)

Reply


@pwned1 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Well, at least my .su domain still works...

Reply


@83457 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

WWWW1

Reply


@toyg 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is the first European conflict of the internet era where one side gets economically isolated in a very radical way. A lot of theories about modern economic warfare and its effects, are being tested in the real world - stuff like "Country X cannot wage war because the economic blowback would destroy them". I expect the Chinese are watching it attentively, to name one interested party (eh).

If this strategy works, we might have secured the century for good. If it doesn't, it will feel like the clock has gone back 100 years - and those weren't nice times to be around.

Reply


@qiskit 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

> Unfortunately, due to the Russian regime's war crimes and human rights violations in Ukraine

Just to clarify, does your policy only apply to russians and their war crimes and human rights violations against ukraine specifically or is it a blanket policy? Will you refuse to register users from say the UK or France for their war crimes and human rights violations? Or say israel or saudi arabia? Or china or the US?

I guess I'm asking is this, are you doing this for free publicity or for genuine moral concern. You've been in business since 2000 and russia attacked georgia ( 2008? ). Did you stop registration also? Also, since 2000, there have been war crimes committed in iraq, afghanistan, syria, libya, etc, can you remind us what actions you took then and which peoples you prevented from using your service.

Reply


@thenanyu 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

We (the West) just vaporized half of Russia's GDP. This seems like small beans.

Reply


@unmiss 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

база с возу, кобыле легче

Reply


@SetorArepo 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

What a great thing you do, heh.

Yes, I'm from Russia, too. I've got several 2nd level domains in .com, .net, .org and .info, and I'm used to use services from registrars like namecheap, actually I was using namecheap for a couple of years in the past. What I never did is, well, I never used these .ru and .su, it is obvious local government can do anything to 2lds under these tlds. BTW, it is much much simpler to run a site, or whatever, under these tlds when you're in Russia, you can pay in local currencies, you've got consumer rights protection, you don't need to understand English (yes, many people here don't understand English), etc. Pro-putin people mostly go this way, why they would do anything else. If you're "patriotic" (in that special putin's sense) you wouldn't prefer services provided by foreigners over those available locally in Russia.

Who do use your (or other registrars like you) services are those who don't want to enable putin's secret police to shut down their sites. In fact I doubt you can find a single pro-putin russian among your customers. Those pro-putin brain-washed "patriots" mostly don't speak English and (heh, yes) don't fully understand what is DNS how the domain names work.

The people you strike at -- your customers from Russia -- are mostly those who protest against the war and get arrested by putin's police. And as of now, with all the sanctioning mess, many of them have difficulties with their bank cards, and those who only have their bank accounts in the local currency, also have to pay the transfer fees at horrifying conversion rates.

Great shot guys.

Fortunately enough, I left your services and went to another registrar several years ago.

Reply


@allisdust 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is quite unprofessional of them. Unless the jurisdiction specifically forbids it, taking sides like this and kicking out their paying customers with little notice is nothing but opportune posturing that reeks of deplatforming. Don't take out your grievances on already subjugated population.

Reply


@cft 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

It's the same registrar that threatened to turn off our 3000 Alexa rank site due to a defective copyright notice on one of the 30 million user subdomains! Our legal counsel had to write to them a threatening letter to buy time, and then we fled immediately.

Reply


@cheald 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm no fan of Putin or the Russian government's war, but I originally moved to Namecheap from GoDaddy over GoDaddy's support for SOPA. I want my registrar to be a registrar, not a political entity. Looks like I'll be looking for a new registrar to do business with going forward.

The Russian government are the bad guys here - people who happen to be in Russia are not. I'm not gonna do business with a company that gutpunches uninvolved individuals for political points.

Reply


@jchiu1106 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is a terrible move. Virtue signaling at it's worst. Putin literally gives p 0 f'ck about namecheap. It doesn't do squat to him but meanwhile you're hurting regular Russian users for something they have no control over. Do you think they will be pressuring Putin to stop the war bc they can't use namecheap anymore? They will likely to be more mad at the west. Lastly, doing this is just going to increase the segregation of the internet even more which goes completely against the original intention of the internet.

Reply


@warner_of_doom 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

When exactly are you planning to punish our (American) political class for its war crimes and human rights violations?

How about punishing us for our operatives that began the 2014 putsch in Ukraine?

How about punishing us for Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Libya, Yemen, etc., etc.?

How about the drone strikes that killed an innocent family?

NO. You are exactly what is wrong in this world. Hypocrisy is fine. But, not recognizing it is just evil.

More virtue-signalling and grand-standing. Nothing more. You think that little yellow-blue flag on your site makes the world better? No. It doesn't. Recognizing the complexity of this situation would make you a better company in my eyes.

I was planning on buying myself a domain for my little self-hosted project. I am crossing Namecheap off the list of providers I was considering. Adios.

Reply


@mmaunder 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

For context, it looks like Namecheap has about 1700 team members in Ukraine, if I'm reading this right.

https://www.namecheap.com/careers/ukraine/

One of the offices is Kharkiv which the Russians shelled with cluster bombs: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/02/28/kharkiv-rock...

Sounds like it happened today - and the date/time on the article above is this evening:

https://twitter.com/_vsv_/status/1498458616155852805

Reply


@fmcoder 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Isn't it a discrimination based on nationality? We're a small company in Russia and things are already hard for us. And now this. We do not support Putin or his war, why hit on us?

Reply


@startoffs 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Namecheap is just being cheap. With all the racist extremist groups on your server, it is with the common russian resident that you want virtue signal?

Reply


@underwatersea 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

As a US based Namecheap customer for over 5 years, that supports Ukraine, I will be moving somewhere else, this in my opinion is not a way to do business. Internet needs to remain free. I live in NY and Namecheap is in Arizona, will I get banned one day when Namecheap disagrees with an action by the NY government?

Reply


@rsync 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is a ridiculous position to take and will lead to both needless pain and suffering (average Russian citizens have quite a lot to deal with, not the least of which being their devalued currency) and direct harm to actors inside and outside Russia using this infrastructure for critical communications.

It's not at all a stretch to imagine that some of this infrastructure is being used to provide political and social support to Ukrainian positions and/or to assail Russian positions. Some of that support most certainly comes from within Russia.

Namecheap is not a gaming site: you chose to run infrastructure and when you run infrastructure you must run it as if lives depend on it. There is no way you can know what chains of dependency and support rely on you and there is no way you can know if the eventual beneficiaries of those chains are good or bad actors.

If you see an account behaving badly, remove it without collateral damage.

Otherwise, keep the lights on and keep doing your boring job.

Reply


@Grim-444 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Could someone recommend me good alternatives? I'll be moving all of my domains. I will never support any business that decides to go political and start deplatforming/censoring, whether I agree with their views or not.

Reply


@pl0x 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I have over 30 domains with Namecheap and will be leaving for good. This move is uncalled for since regular people on both sides are suffering.

Reply


@suilied 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

"We're not deplatforming you, but basically, you can't use this platform, and if you were, please get off the platform"

This is truly the darkest timeline. What happened to "information wants to be free"? Your just participating in making yet another gulag archipelago.

Reply


@yrgulation 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Initially my comment was that i approve of this. We need to calm down. Some russians are also a victim of putin. While from the comfort of my arm chair is easy to demand that russians show the same bravery as ukranians and topple their dictator, the reality is different.

We need to let our governments take drastic action, and sure, us as citizens stand up to anyone in support of putin and the war but not issue blanket bans and private sanctions.

We dont want to create the conditions of the first world war where innocent germans were punished for actions they were not responsible for, led to misery and was later on used as propaganda. Many in Russia dont even understand the enormity of what is happening, and that includes some here on this forum. Yes you can be well educated and highly paid and still not understand that russia has attacked humanity itself in the name of long gone glory and pride.

As such i would kindly ask that namecheap changes this policy and applies it only to those customers that display clear support for the putinists (i.e. government entities, propaganda farms, money launderers and so on).

Remember, Germans were the first casualty of the nazis.

I stand for ukraine, but i stand for freedom loving russians too.

Reply


@firekvz 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

As a non-russia customer, I am inmediatly moving all of my domains I host at namecheap to another provider.

this kind of stuff from private companies are useless, and downvote me all you want, they do not work, and dont come to lecture me from your SF desk while im living in a sanctioned country, how did the 2017-2019 sactions for Venezuela worked? Everyone in the world moved on and even forgot about our country, and the comunist regime is more alive than ever, all the sactions just fucked the regular people like me, for example my gf is still explaining after 2 years to those idiots at transferwise support that her money sitting on their super awesome "no borders account" has nothing to do with the venezuelan govt and that it's from her US based remote job but they just decided to steal over 22k USD from her solely based on her citizenship. Or should I tell you how stripe completely killed my friend's startup by suspending their accout because they had venezuelans IPs and venezuelan citizenship and aparently they aren't able to check that they (normal citizens) arent the people on the OFAC list, (like 5 names LOL)

So yeah, dont mind me, get your likes, get all the nice advertisiment you want while prettending you are helping and is nothing more than a PR move while messing with normal people with normal lives, struggling everyday but you won't get me as a customer anymore, we are all suppose to be professionals at our tech jobs.

Reply


@kaziboxa 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

ICANN + lawsuit

Reply


@MattyRad 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Ah, they went with a 403 status code. A couple days ago I asked about which status code was most appropriate for non-compliance/sanctions:

https://serverfault.com/questions/1094841/which-http-status-...

Perhaps there's room for a new status code?

Reply


@lieseverywhere 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

i cant find anyone saying anything about a CEO taking a political stance when they provide a service (basically discrimination)... is nobody seeing what is happening here? History (not the propaganda) should be a clue. What did happen in Germany? a specific people were denigrated and blocked from using services no? where did it lead? people who did not fall for the barbarism and propaganda were classed as sympathisers and treated the same. it takes not a long time. Do we have to mention Gaza too, Iraq? Yugoslavia/Bosnia...there is a list a big list and guess what, its predominantly western funded to covertly/overtly.

I am immune suppressant and a vaccine could kill me but what nearly killed me was the same behaviour here from a Corporation/s who stopped me from accessing essential services. And this move is for the care and concern of people.... I will be moving to a REAL company with morals and brains. You are doing to one people what your supposedly standing up against and marketing it!

Qui Bono, what you getting out of this NC Ceo? Time will tell and there's going to be a lot of cognitive Dissonance going around soon enough.

Pathetic crony of the fascistic global capitalist overlords. Yes I'm western, Yes I can source the truth, I do not watch the spew from anything mainstream and I detest infowars, just saying.

You don't know me and I'm asking, is this legal, I think (I will be asking my Lawyer Wife) your open to claims big time and I'm sure many will hear about this approach and walk, i really hope so. I had a similar experience with a VPN service, I walked and told a hell of a lot of people. You mr/ms/LGBTQIZM CEO are a part of oppression just like the megalomaniacs on the other side.

This never stops with the beginning reasons, never! A free internet is becoming a dream. Your involved in censorship simple!

Reply


@francisofascii 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is “better that the innocent suffer than to support the guilty” reasoning.

Reply


@EGreg 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I agree that Russia is violating International law, and possibly committing war crimes at this very moment. But why don’t we apply the same standard to US or China when they do it?

I am not talking about boycotting or private businesses refusing to serve people from a country. I mean sanctions proportional to the damage!

No one would ever put sanctions on the USA no matter what we did. We could invade a country and occupy it for years, or totally destroy its government. We could drop nukes on it. Oh wait we did all these things.

Just as one example that was condemned by the UN: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_invasion_of_Pa...

The USA would never allow anyone to do to us what we routinely do to them. Imagine if USA were to, I dunno, attempt to invade a neighboring country, carve out a piece for ourselves, and then that country would ask Russia for help and Russia would put nuclear missiles on it…

Oh wait. Cuba. Bay of pigs invasion. Guantanamo. Cuban missile crisis…

Shoe on other foot for USA means unacceptable.

Imagine if Russia started arming “moderate rebels” against the president of Mexico, and they wound up joining the Zetas and Sinaloa cartel, and taking control of entire cities in Mexico. Russia would say we are propping up a brutal dictator who is cracking down on drug gangs brutally. Imagine Russian weapons would be used by drug gangs to kill Mexicans.

What would USA do? We all know.

Imagine if Russia started an alliance to “contain US expansion” into Central and South America and sign up countries that have historical grievances with US doing stuff like, I dunno, trainingg rebels and overthrowing their governments. Maybe start with Nicaragua and Panama, then gradually get closer.

Would the USA allow this? Shoe on other foot.

George W Bush was a worse actor than Putin by far. And got zero sanctions. He still gets to joke around and give speeches after large swarhs of the entire middle east were destroyed. Remember that guy campaigned on NO NATION BUILDING! Unbelievable

The world is fixated on Putin invading Ukraine and possibly doing regime change there. They are united in imposing extremely harsh sanctions that will affect the people of Russia. While USA Presidents have done far worse things just in the last 20 years, and the world doesnt really have a say… means we are above international law baby !!!

So, all this about “we would accept sanctions” please. We have privilege. The biggest baddest kind of privilege. White privilege is nothing compared to AMERICAN privilege baby.

I will leave China as an exercise to the reader. I will say this though… in the US we have freedom of speech, so people like myself and Noam Chomsky can live here AND openly speak the uncomfortable truth about what our country has done. Russians and Chinese can’t.

So in that respect, USA is far better.

Reply


@oefrha 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

As someone who’s usually strongly anti-crypto, this piece of news just bolstered my support for fully decentralized domain registration systems, whether blockchain based or not, by 10x. In the short term I’m moving all my Namecheap domains to another registrar (as a non-Russian who’s not affected, yet). In the long term I hope we do away with all of these parasitic registrars for something as fundamental as domain name registration. They provide exactly nothing other than adding a couple entries to someone else’s zone file.

Reply


@godmode2019 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Why punish people normal people for what their government is doing.

It's not like they can choose their government.

Namecheaps own government is still drone bombing people and invading whom ever they want. Should we ban American citizens from foreign services?

No. Just ban anything related to the government, not normal people.

I have Russians at my company, should I fire them because of their ethnicity? Clearly not, that's discrimination at least in my country (applied to companies as well)

I'll be moving my 50 domains from namecheap to a less politically motivated company.

Reply


@ks_rao 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I am not sure whether namecheap.com is sending this notices randomly to any one. I own common domain extensions like .com, .news, .io, .ai and .co. I am definitely not Russian nor anything to do with Russia, rather Indian living in Singapore. I am following with them through tickets and on twitter. They know my whois registration address and my payment card details which prove my identity. Really frustrated from morning.

Reply


@andrewnicolalde 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Good on you, Namecheap. You’ve earned my continued business and genuine respect with this action.

Reply


@MockObject 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Perhaps a better solution would have been to offer free service to Russian people. Connectivity is the best strategy against dictatorship.

Reply


@logicalmonster 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Is Namecheap going to be deplatforming Americans the next time the government bombs somebody? Should Chinese citizens be deplatformed for numerous human rights violations by their government?

Reply


@hashimotonomora 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Is this allowed by ICANN?

Reply


@concinds 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

It may interest you to know that Namecheap, just a few days ago, banned a few domain names purely based on an ambiguous tweet that got 8 likes, that didn't even ask for those domains to be banned or cite any ToS violation.

https://twitter.com/Namecheap/status/1489485337885921284

Namecheap then reverted that decision when they got ratioed (with no tweets supporting their decision). I've never heard of these domain names and don't keep up with crypto, but it doesn't seem like they did much research before banning them.

I was thinking of switching everything to Namecheap just a week ago, because of a friend's recommendation based on their ease-of-use.

Because of this Twitter story, and the Russian suspension, I'm now glad I didn't. You can't cancel users' service, that they paid for, and give them only a week's notice. I'm not Russian but this volatile style of customer relationships totally destroys any trust I could have in them.

Reply


@sgt 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Is Russia committing war crimes? That is new to me. I know of the invasion and the war, obviously, but I did not know there are war crimes being committed.

Reply


@throwaway2674 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I created this account just to inform you that I am moving all my business away from your platform.

Reply


@wetpaws 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I hate when corporations do hypocrite virtue signaling pretending to fight for just cause. Dudes, Putin and government are not using your service, real people are. You are racist and nationalist scum pretending to be just.

Reply


@pictur 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is the site with the most horrible user experience I've ever seen. A site so stupid that it says we can't verify your identity even though I sent a recovery email with the mail I registered with. There really is no logical explanation for why they could be this big with godaddy. I hope it ends soon. Please do not use this site. If you are using it, stop using it.

Reply


@dgan 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This makes me very uncomfortable, as a Russian. I have been living in Europe for the last > 16 years non stop (=refugee), but I still have (the only) Russian citizenship.

I completely understand the utter pointless of current war, but when will we start to see random Russians being threatened just for the sake being/speaking Russian on the street? You can't say both "Don't generalize!! All `X` are not like this!" and then go "Oh yeah all Russian bad. No cookie for your Russian a$$".

I don't see it happening right now, but that thought have crossed my mind already, and I am sure if that war continues, I won't be alone having it

Reply


@konart 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

So basically you are withholding any money I've paid you in case my domains are paid through 2025 (for example).

Reply


@risyachka 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I will respond to this one.

It's good that you tried to fight the regime. Clearly it wasn't enough.

You live in society, not in the woods. The majority decides how all live - like in any other country. In your country majority decided not to overthrow dictatorship. As result, minority suffers. So here is your answer.

Reply


@poushkar 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I fully support the decision. My perspective about regular people of Russia and if they should be sharing the responsibility for the war in Ukraine here: http://nywkap.com/politics/russian-responsibility.html

Reply


@aluminum96 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Many people in this thread seem to feel that a Namecheap domain is an inalienable right. On the contrary, a company whose employees are being brutally besieged as we speak has every right to reassess who it does business with.

Reply


@xanaxagoras 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm not in Russia and I don't really care about this war (sorry, just being honest!) but this isn't the kind of internet I want, where companies show their virtue by taking political positions and removing service from their customers (looking at you AWS). The domain and e-mail service that I paid money for shouldn't be contingent on my government behaving and continuing to behave in a manor that Namecheap approves of.

> If you hold any top-level domains with us, we ask that you transfer them to another provider by March 6, 2022.

I'll be transferring them this evening, GFY.

Reply


@lwneal 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I was surprised by this, until I realized that one of Namecheap's offices is in downtown Kharkiv. Today, the Russian military bombed Kharkiv with cluster munitions [1]. Civilians were killed, possibly including children [2].

Given the severity of the situation, I'm surprised that Namecheap has not opted for more drastic measures- for example, redirecting Russian web traffic. Simply transferring Russian businesses to other providers might be among the less-drastic options they considered.

[1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e42F1V3AOq4&t=150s

[2] https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/02/28/kharkiv-rock...

Reply


@MysticKnight 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I also got this email. How will this affect me?

I dont have any Russian domains/tlds, nor am I in Russia and never have been. I'm in England, born here and have lived here my whole life?

The only domains I have are ".xyz" , ".cam", ".pw" tlds. My hosting is from Hetzner in Germany.

I have zero links to Russia.

The email says in bold "If you hold any top-level domains with us, we ask that you transfer them to another provider by March 6, 2022."

Which makes it seem to me like you are saying it will affect me somehow?

Reply


@kaziboxa 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

until you understand that it is not countries and peoples that are at war, but elites are at war - you will continue to be a victim of your false beliefs.

Reply


@TobyTheDog123 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I've also transferred all of my domains out of Namecheap, not many (15 total) but I won't support a business that blames citizens for their leader and punishes them for something they had nothing to do with.

This is an absolutely pathetic showing that has destroyed a decade of trust in a couple of hours (I bought my first domain from Namecheap in 2012)

As this is now the kind of behavior we can expect of Namecheap, I do not trust them to do the right thing when it comes to upholding their other values (such as the one they mentioned, free speech). This is a CEO who is letting their (justified) emotions make crucial business decisions that do nothing but decay trust.

Epik is jumping for joy right now.

Reply


@tintor 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

How many of you have protested USA and boycotted their products during 78 of days of bombing of civilians in Yugoslavia in 1999? Ukraine was making statements in supports of such aggression.

Reply


@realcertify 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

There used to be a time when the US and Europe were dream countries, millions of people always considered them to be the safe havens duly protected by the best laws. This made those countries prosper, as anyone who had high earnings from third world countries would immediately invest them into first world ones, the best minds would come and work there. Now everything changes quick. Russians, even anti-Putun ones figure that nobody needs them in the West, and the protections by law no longer exist. Next is the rest of the world.

Reply


@jesterson 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Getting hype on current events via creating inconveniences for regular people is plainly disgusting. This kind of virtue signalling is unfortunately not rare nowadays.

Disclaimer: not affected by that, moved from namecheap for other reasons (terrible service) and never regretted it.

Reply


@femiagbabiaka 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I have to wonder what the bar for this sort of severe action is considering that so many companies seem to be taking these steps. If it is "country invades another country" or "human rights abuse happening perpetrated by $COUNTRY" then I think there's a long list of regimes that need to be added to the will not serve list.

Reply


@jackguy 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Is this covered by the ToS or are they making things up as they go?

Reply


@fuoqi 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This virtue signaling is just plain stupid, same as the vodka boycott (FYI less than 2% of vodka in US is imported from Russia).

Reply


@powerslacker 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Are there any official sources for this? I did a quick google search and couldn't find any announcements.

Reply


@andrewmcwatters 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I left GoDaddy due to their backing of SOPA years ago.[1] It appears that Namecheap is interested in political virtue signaling, and I want to de-risk. Who should I move to?

[1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GoDaddy#Backing_of_SOPA_and_re...

Reply


@mkbkn 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Can't believe so-called "liberal" tech is being used to deny services to people based on their country of birth or passport. It's ridiculous to even think of such a move.

This is carpet-bombing people. Sure some Russian propaganda websites will take the hit but everyone? Don't be that fool. Stop misusing your power.

Reply


@unixbane 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is stupid like 99% of corporate censorship actions and yet again demonstrating why pointlessly centralized address books (like DNS) are bad (the alternative I have in mind is petnames, before someone thinks I'm referring to some wacky solution).

Reply


@space_rock 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Thank you Namecheap!

Reply


@Jahak 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Oh no...

Reply


@29athrowaway 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Even if they did not do this, how would you pay for Namecheap considering all the banking related blocking? How can Namecheap comply with the new sanctions?

Reply


@wg0 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

That's unfortunate. And I for the record, think Russian invasion of Ukraine is a serious threat to the whole globe, the conflict potentially might get out of hands with no limits in sight.

However, businesses should not take political or legal stances on their own. This is a slippery slope as many have pointed out.

Rather let the governments decide on that part. When a government decides something, at that point - it becomes a legal obligation and a justified action.

Otherwise, it is an abrupt all of sudden termination of contract which would make potential and existing customers uncomfortable as well.

What's the guarantee that Namecheap won't pull the plug on European or Chinese customers some day with similar rationale?

Reply


@kytazo 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

oh thanks for the reminder to move off all my domains.. this proves my intuition right namecheap smells exactly like godaddy or w/e. Glad I do this cause who knows maybe our leaders will invade somebody and all of the sudden I'll be having another headache on top of everything else. Talking about human rights while you're abusing them by denying service to people that have absolutely no ties to their goverment but gods rnd dice rolled them into a certain country which happens to go in war with another.. pardon me but that's just stupid

Reply


@racombinator 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

@NamecheapCEO I'm very angry after your email. I'm not registered in Russia, I'm not Russian, it's not my authoritarian government, but anyway you're right all west governments became authoritarian lately and committed human rights abuses against their own citizens, Canada, Italy, USA, Germany, France...... Don't get involved in political matters, politicians just follow their own interests, they don't mind anymore about their voters, they are like a flag. With your email you are declaring war to me, my company could be bring you to court or I can start a personal war. Think twice before jumping inside something much bigger than you, world wars start in that way, you are still in time. With love

Reply


@breakingcups 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Let me prefix this by saying I'm not Russian, I have no ties to Russia whatsoever and I strongly oppose Putin's actions in Ukraine.

That said, I wonder about the legal ramifications of this move. Namecheap is essentially unilaterally terminating a (probably yearly) contract without the other party being at fault per se. There's no legal cause.

Will they be refunding the customers they are kicking out? Or will they be keeping the money for services not rendered?

Additionally, giving people only 4 working days to move out, especially in a situation as volatile as this, seems like a bad move. Anyone hosting their life on one of the domains affected (whether they are actually in Russia or mistakenly flagged as it seems happens a lot going by this thread) might not read the message in time. They might be in hospital, jail, without internet or otherwise unable to transfer in the very short time allotted. Again, not just the people Namecheap hopes to target, but also all the people they mistakenly flagged.

(And you can bet some disgruntled Russian customer will flood the support system with whitelist requests for all .ru domains currently pointing at Namecheap NS, overloading the support system for the remaining 4 working days until the deadline)

I understand that the Namecheap CEO and many of his employees are probably having a strong emotional reaction to the current war in Ukraine which is completely understandable. I fear this will not accomplish what they really desire though. And I don't think I'll be cheering them on.

Reply


@kavalg 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

While I deeply understand Namecheap's sentiment, it still feels as a bad move to me. IMHO, net neutrality shall be above this. If not, at some point in time we are just going to have Western, Russian and Chinese internet (the latter more or less already implemented).

Reply


@liquidise 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

What a horrifying policy. This may be tone-deaf as Namecheap has many Ukrainian employees, but this policy is antithetical to customer needs in an infrastructure company.

The US has a history entering conflicts i fervently disagree with. Wars and smaller, more targeted attacks. The idea that my business's production infrastructure could be at risk because some POTUS drone strikes the wrong wedding is exactly the sort of reactionary policy-making i try to avoid when choosing which companies i associate with my production infrastructure. This general neutrality was a reason i became a Namecheap customer many years ago.

I won't say that i can empathize at all with those deeply affected by this war. I fully understand people want to use the means at their control to change the tide here. But as a customer, this move scares me.

Reply


@aalina 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Hi,

If you need help to transfer your domain or hosting, kindly check my gig https://www.fiverr.com/aalina/transfer-domain-web-hosting-da...

Reply


@yucare 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Next step: Send all Russian employees home to fight against the regime.

Reply


@hereforphone 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Taking bets for how long until the CEO backtracks on this and says we misunderstood his intention.

Reply


@AmericanOP 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

To all the Russians who think they are being inconvenienced now: Just wait.

Reply


@DoItToMe81 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Namecheap is by far the worst registrar I've ever used. Through the years, I've occasionally had people who wanted my domains use bots to spam abuse reports on them, and Namecheap remains as one of two that buckled.

Reply


@ev0lv 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is an attack on the Russian citizen, a normal person who works a normal job.

I do not agree that the valid response is to hurt innocent bystanders. FU namecheap.

Reply


@scoobysnacks22 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm incredibly proud to have Namecheap as my domain registrar. I wish there was more business I could send your way. Not many companies would stand this their staff in this way. Thank you Rick and everyone else! --Martin

Reply


@dreamsbythelake 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Thank you, Namecheap! It is really rare to see a business with human face. You are the best, Namecheap Team! (That's why I am holding my domains with you ;-) Please don't cave in to bulling now.) Слава Україні!

Reply


@ephatha 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I don't have any issue with this policy, but Namecheap doesn't have any issue with hosting Indian scam centers attempting to harvest identities for purposes of committing crimes against Americans such as http://careers-dominionenergy.online

They also don't have an abuse reporting form.

It's fun to pretend to have morals on the internet.

Reply


@namecheapTA 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I've spent a thousand+ dollars at namecheap over the years. I've been a huge cheerleader for namecheap to my cloud crazy friends because of the great value for what you pay for, and great support even for their shared hosting.

I'm not affected by this, but I won't be as evangelical as I have been. I won't be migrating away, but for my next pet project, I'll probably check another provider out.

I understand they are being emotional because they have employees there. But they should step back and realize they are just being discriminatory and mean to people that basically don't have a choice.

Should I find the closest Russian owned business in my city and protest in front so that the owner loses money? For all I know he sends money back home to his mother!

Reply


@R4p1dH0n3Y 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

In short period of time I will move all my domains and ded. hosting. I'm a anti war person, I hate war from bottom of my heart. I can understand your emotions, but I can't get the point that you are blocking Russian individuals and not RU government. Today you decide with emotion what will be next? I don't know. Maybe you start blocking EU citizens too simply because we will not allow Ukraine to join the European Union just like that. I see it simple - from my point of view Ukraine has big problem with corruption & low transparency in general.

Should I start to judge everyone by their religion, nationality... etc.

When you judge another, you do not define them, you define yourself. - Wayne Dyer

Reply


@pawel90210 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I do not doubt that many Russian citizens are appalled by the actions of their government, and certainly resisting or protesting is risky for them and incurs significant penalties. But these penalties are not remotely comparable to what is being inflicted on innocent Ukrainians. This is a situation that has resulted from 20 years of inaction and acquiescence during which an increasingly thuggish Putin and his cronies have gotten rich and been emboldened. The only solution now is for Russians themselves to change things - they need to get behind Navalny or some other opposition leader and force a change and, sorry if this is going to be costly for some of them, but those Russians complaining really need to find their balls, like Navalny, Nemtsov and others and deal with their problem. Nobody else can do this.

Reply


@hereforphone 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

If they're willing to terminate service for political reasons in this case, who's to say they won't do it in the future for other political reasons? Here begins the slippery slope of Namecheap terminating service to those it deems "wrong".

Been a happy, confident Namecheap user for a long time. Now I'm not so confident.

Reply


@crossroadsguy 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Anybody affected by this or not, at this point I’d really recommend moving your domains away ASAP from such unstable leadership anyway. Just read in the comments and see how this person seems to be taking such critical decisions at whims comment by comment. They seem to have simply lost the plot. Tomorrow it can simply be you at the receiving end unless you change your passport to where this company is based (not sure even that will work) - assuming they’d give a clean chit to at least that country.

PS. Or maybe Namecheap is making a smart preemptive business move. It’s a good possibility that very soon Russians might not be able to pay them for renewals (at least for sometime) and then when they start letting the domains expire, and rightly so, they do not want to deal with “please be considerate”.

Reply


@exizt88 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is a really, really fucked up thing to do. Many Russians are currently scrambling to move their families and businesses abroad, away from Putin's regime (myself included). This will put additional pressure on people who are in a very difficult situation already and actively oppose the war.

I sincerely hope Namecheap reconsiders.

Reply


@varundhawan5792 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Somehow I have a feeling that such acts will only turn the supportive Russian citizens against Ukraine.

Reply


@lieseverywhere 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

i cant find anyone saying anything about a CEO taking a political stance when they provide a service... is nobody seeing what is happening here? History (not the propaganda) should be a clue. What did happen in Germany? a specific people were denigrated and blocked from using services no? where did it lead? people who did not fall for the barbarism were classed as sympathisers and treated the same. it takes not a long time.

I am immune suppressant and a vaccine could kill me but what nearly killed me was the same behaviour here from a Corporation/s who stopped me from accessing services. And this move is the care and concern of people.... I will be moving to a REAL company with morals and brains.

Reply


@happybuy 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

As a Namecheap customer who has nothing to do with Russia or the Ukraine, this type of selective political censoring rubs me the wrong way.

I don't want to use a utility or service provider who thinks they have some special virtuous ability to evaluate and judge the ethical behaviour or appropriateness of their customers.

If customers are breaking the law or laws are passed that mean that you can't provide service to customers in certain countries or regions, then fine kick them off your service. Otherwise provide the service that you operate.

This type of response makes me less likely to continuing to use Namecheap in the future.

Reply


@rmnc 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is really wrong. I'm a Russian national, and I'm not supporting aggression towards Ukraine. In contrast, I've spent last two days in police after being detained due to the fact that I dared to express my condemnation in public protest.

I am not my government, and apart from starting a one-man revolution with a pretty obvious result, I'm doing everything I can to raise awareness, condemn actions of Russian government, and put an end to this. I've been doing so since 2011, back when I was a college student.

Namecheap -- this is a low move. While I do understand that your company has a lot of Ukrainian employees, all of which are in grave danger, you're not doing anyone a favor by making a shitty life of most Russian nationals even shittier.

Reply


@scruffyherder 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Great idea! Now go through public records and deplatform the deplorables. Use the "off platform behaviour" code that is so very progressive of you.

I hope I have nothing registered with you, but obviously you cannot be trusted.

Reply


@monkeywork 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'd suggest hover.com / tucows as an alternative provider that isn't doing these actions.

Reply


@sandstrom 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Hello Namecheap: Are you sure this will help your objective?

Putin is a monster and his war is horrible.

As you've probably seen from the 'prisoners of war' videos out of Ukraine, most soldiers don't want to fight this war (and are mislead).

Tech-savvy Russians (have their own domain) will also be the ones that use a VPN to read foreign news. Very few in the Russian "tech scene" like Putin.

Shutting down their means of communication may make it harder for them to arrange demonstrations, etc.

Instead, you should "magically" add emails to their inboxes, with e.g. Zelenskyy's speech to the Russian people, or add banners when they login to control panels etc.

(I'm not Russian btw, I'm European and not a customer)

Reply


@bitcharmer 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Thank you for standing against barbarism

A lot of immature crybabies here who think it somehow compares being mildly inconvenienced and bombed in your sleep.

Russians have a very long way to go if this is still their attitude in the face of everything their regime is doing. Well, as a Pole whose family was kidnapped and let to die in Syberia this nation definitely has a lot to learn when it comes to taking responsibility.

I'm moving all my domains to Namecheap.

Reply


@hashimotonomora 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Are they following a law or just arbitrarily and unilaterally deciding to do this? I am not Russian myself but I expect a domain name provider to be extremely neutral, unopinionated, and stable. Namecheap is showing to be neither so it can’t be trusted for important domains.

Reply


@tartoran 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is going to crush the opposition and demoralize these people even more while it will have zero effect on Putin.

Reply


@mohanmcgeek 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Might as well transfer your domains right now even if you're not from Russia because now that this precedent has been set, we don't know when they'll cancel your country.

Reply


@rep_movsd 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Yes, always punish a population for the actions of their leaders.

Reply


@spoonjim 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Poorly thought out policy (migrate domains in 1 week?) made in the heat of the moment when everyone has a better place to be directing their attention. Expect a reversal within 72 hours but a permanent loss of customer trust (I have five domains with Namecheap but for the first time ever I’m now wondering if that’s smart).

Reply


@freddealmeida 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Please remove Canadian sites too. Trudeau is a known dictator. Shouldn't you be against him committing human rights abuses? The Supreme court of NZ also found their PM was committing outrageous human rights abuses. will you block them as well? Stop acting like an arm of the US administration. You provide domains. Stay in your lane or be consistent you hypocrites.

Reply


@vadkou 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

OK, I just spent $150 transferring domains to GoDaddy. Considering this was forced by Namecheap's actions, which are "definitely not deplatforming", I can surely expect reimbursement?

Ticket ID #CWL-599-95208

Also, what about getting money for domains paid in advance? I've had a domain paid until May 21, 2026, as I've trusted Namecheap (my oldest domain name with them was registered on Jun 30, 2015). Some domain zones I used for development purposes (cheap .cyou offer) cannot be transferred to reputable registrars like GoDaddy. What to do about those?

Reply


@xtracto 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I am from a third party country that has absolutely nothing to do with this war, but my thought after seeing Russian civilians complain about these policies is that, they should stand up, go out of their home and complain to their government.

The reason why all the world is doing this is because their freaking leader (Putin) has threatened nuclear war, and is pushing for war, invading a country. Like... hello? you have no business in any international matter (finance, sport, gaming, internet, etc) until you fix your shit in your country.

So yeah, I am happy that this thing is making Russian civilians uncomfortable. Hopefully they will be uncomfortable enough so that millions of Russian citizens raise their voice and stop this madness, before it is too late.

Reply


@paxys 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

"They should stay neutral in all this!!" – people sitting comfortably in a first world country opining about a company whose 1700 employees in Ukraine – including in Kharkiv – (https://www.namecheap.com/careers/ukraine/) are literally getting murdered as we speak. What should they do? Keep taking support calls from Russia while their missiles rain from above?

Reply


@onelastjob 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Incredible that Namecheap would implement such poorly conceived policy!

You’re shutting down Russian dissidents services?

You are a defacto approving of the human rights policies of all the nations that you don’t apply this policy to

Reply


@johnnyApplePRNG 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Personally I am glad I stopped doing business with a business that takes a snap political stance such as this.

I left Namecheap for their price increases years ago. Their names are not cheap by any means. But that's beside the point.

The timeframe they've laid out is ridiculous, for starters. If I had any .su domains with them (which I've always thought were pretty cool relics of the internet) I would be PISSED and SCRAMBLING to make changes right now... Not fun.

If you're in business, do business.

If you're in politics, do politics.

I am extremely happy with porkbun for anyone looking to move away from Namecheap.

For the record, I am 50% Ukrainian.

Shame on you, Namecheap.

The internet was meant to be completely neutral ground.

Reply


@ymolodtsov 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

All I can say, Russian people both inside and outside of Russia are feeling the side effects of this. I don't blame Namecheap, been using it for 7 years probably, always had great experience. And had a feeling they were Ukrainians, solely based on the names of support agents. Will be moving my domains today.

I voted against Putin at every election I could participate. I've seen my friends detained and every protest fail.

Obviously, Ukrainians have it much worse. But we also feel stuck between a rock and a hard place. Russian countersanctions to preserve at least some of the economy are hurting us even more than the world sanctions. I've always been a bit skeptical about crypto but now it feels the only to preserve your savings. Flights, visas and immigrations programs are closing down. And even if Putin dies today (I wish), I feel like this "discrimination" will be there to stay.

Reply


@movedx 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Have they blocked China, as well? You know, because of all the human rights violations and (war) crimes there?

Reply


@throwaway89219 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

been a namecheap customer since 2008, time to move all my domains.

Reply


@netmonk 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Virtue signaling at it's finest. where were you serving ukrainian customers while they were ethnically wiping silently russian speaking peoples of Donbass since 2014 ?

Reply


@otagekki 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Wow, what a way to treat your customers...

In general I think punishing mostly innocent individuals for a decision made by their government is a terrible way to proceed. Furthermore with the 1-week notice you're literally urging people to get off your own platform. I don't condone the Russian-Ukraine war, but just because you take a political stand -- legitimate or not -- doesn't mean it's fair to put undue pressure on .ru domain owners just because those TLDs happen to be Russian (are they even reimbursed?).

I'm not picking any sides here but I won't use Namecheap if I know it can deny me service on a whim just because the government of the country I have registered my domain name in has gone to war with another country. War is force majeure but Namecheap really didn't have to do this: it makes them an unreliable provider in regard to the current world's political instability.

Reply


@Russian 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I believe we should start a group lawsuit against Namecheap in US courts. The damage they will make will be much, MUCH greater than a domain name renewal cost. We didn't violate a single point of the agreement and nobody of us is in US SDN list. This specific company think it can fuck a contract just because they want and we should stop this. Internet is a territory of freedom where we do not sort people.

Reply


@rideg 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I think National origin and Citizenship are protected classes and by federal law. They probably should not discriminate by them.

Reply


@Alir3z4 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Received the same.

Such a shitty move.

Moving some left over from them to nic.ru

Why not ban every single US and NATO country users for the slaughter of many countries including but not limited to Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Palestine, Yemen, Libya... because of the actions of their government?

Fuck this mentality that makes the life of ordinary people harder and call it "sympathy".

Reply


@hamaluik 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I am frankly shocked and dismayed at the number of people deriding this decision. In a grey world this seems like such a black and white thing. Sure it may inconvenience a few, but on the other hand innocents are being slaughtered. All the weight of these complaints don't even begin to touch the scale when compared to literal children being murdered.

Besides all that, Namecheap is a private company and can do business with whomever they wish.

Reply


@jacktribe 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Yes, it's all very unfortunate that you have some additional work to do.

In all seriousness, you need to take a step back and realize that this is a minimal price that we all have to pay, that includes those of us in the western world, to enjoy the freedoms that we have every day.

The current events have a negative impact on the entire world, and it's already bad enough that we have let it get this far and a country found itself defending democracy for the entire world.

Reply


@Chainik 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Has anyone tried to submit a complaint to ICANN?

https://www.icann.org/complaints-office

Reply


@raxi 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

But such moves only shows the unreliability of businesses that preach net neutrality and similar things and in fact discriminate based on ethnicity.

So they show that Putin is right, that democracy and liberalism are dead, that Ukrainians are nazi, and rally people around him even more.

Reply


@AnAmericanPOV64 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I think this is a good way to bring attention to this cause, however, I can't help but point out the notable hypocrisies that this crisis has revealed:

-Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) are legitimate ways to oppose an occupying power? Oh that's quite interesting, I thought that those were considered racist/anti-semitic for the past decade, what happened?

-Sovereignty matters? Interesting, apparently it doesn't matter in the case of U.S. troops occupying the northeast corner of Syria or in the case of the Syrian Golan Heights.

-Refugees are welcome (Hungary/Poland), interesting...I thought that these nations couldn't take on war refugees. Could it have something to do with the skin color of today's refugees versus those from a few years ago?

-In Germany's case, they claimed that they shouldn't pass full SWIFT sanctions because it might hurt Russian civil society. Interesting...they didn't have the same worry when it came to the Iranians for a much smaller offense as invading a neighbor.

Just some uncomfortable food for thought. You may now downvote for pointing out the West's hypocrisy. This obviously does not absolve what Russia has done (stupid I have to even say this, but given today's atmosphere...), but I thought I would point out an aspect of hypocrisy this crisis has brought around.

Reply


@langsoul-com 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Well, this is quite bad service. Only a week to transfer...

Reply


@eps 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This inflicts pain on regular Russian people.

While I understand the need to take a moral stand, this doesn't actually accomplish much. I commented on this before and it bears repeating - the population is heavily brainwashed and many people will view your move as yet another action by the West against the righteous side that they are. Pain, but no reaction.

You want to actually make a difference - keep the service up, let Putin cut it off and let their own regime inflict the very same pain that you are about to inflict. This will net both the pain and a reaction. The way things are going, it will come to exactly that and very soon. They didn't build and test in-country DNS for giggles.

https://techcrunch.com/2019/12/26/russia-starts-testing-its-...

Reply


@a1445c8b 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

You’re blaming ordinary citizens of Russia for a war they did not choose.

These citizens have very little freedom of speech (because Putin) yet you ask them to speak up.

Would you speak up if you lived in Russia and knowing that you could be abducted in the middle of the night and tortured?

Reply


@IYasha 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I expect you to do the same for US, GB or IL nationals when their governments invade yet another mid-east country.

Reply


@savaof 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Namecheap CEO, I have two simple questions for you: 1) Would you do this if the revenue from Russian users was 50% of the total revenue? 2) Wouldn't it be more effective if you use the revenue from Russian users to help Ukraine or hire an assassin for Putin?

Reply


@VincentEvans 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I am not at all surprised and I think Russian citizens will see ever more of this as the invasion of Ukraine continues and shouldn’t be surprised as their links with the rest of the world start fraying and normal life starts fading in the rear view mirror…

Whether that kind of action is effective or even makes sense, I have no idea. I just don’t think it is even a little surprising. Russia started a war and you will see sides taken. As 190,000 Russian troops, artillery, and air-force rain death on Ukrainian population centers you can’t possibly expect to be able to play some CoD or watch a movie on Netflix like it’s any other day…

Reply


@Mikanoshi 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

It's like they don't have enough problems as it is, they also want to annoy clients and destroy their own business. Their choice. Even if they reconsider it's a good idea to move anyway, such behavior makes them extremely unreliable.

Reply


@glerk 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

For everyone looking for a new registrar, I suggest Porkbun, they are usually cheaper, provide the same features as Namecheap and hav excellent customer support. In support of all the innocent people affected by Namecheap's actions, I will also be transferring all my domains out of Namecheap.

Reply


@ignoramous 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I see some tech companies (especially infrastructure providers) hopping on the cancel culture train because it is also free marketing, at this point... Their shallow stance makes it clear they first decided they have to cancel the Russians, and then come up with passable, bordering on incoherent reasons to do so.

I wish for consumer companies to think of second-order effects before committing to such measures.

Though, the train is well and truly on a rampage, at this point... there's no stopping it... you'll be left behind if you don't hop on one... damned if you do, damned if you don't.

Reply


@ritcgab 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I cannot see the goal of this move. Those Russian users will move to other platforms and those platforms will still pay taxes on their Russian sales - which in turn helps authoritarian government. What is the difference?

Or is it just because it is harder for Russian users to make payments?

Reply


@akamaka 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is an extremely big mistake. Not in the sense of politics, but because domain name providers are entrusted by the community to manage a very important and valuable asset. You shouldn’t be making these decisions amongst yourselves and without input from the people and businesses you serve. In fact, there’s a word to describe this type of decision making process, which you might be hearing a lot in the news right now.

Reply


@jdrc 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

For a company that is basically run from Ukraine, this is mildly worded.

Reply


@Symbiote 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

They have 1700 staff in Ukraine, by far the majority of their employees, so it's not surprising that they see things differently to others.

https://www.namecheap.com/careers/ukraine/

Reply


@AmericanOP 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Yay good for you

Reply


@ryanqian 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

How stupid these big corps are spliting the world. That's why each country should develop their own Internet Infrastructure.

Reply


@vbezhenar 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

While I'm not from Russia, I guess I have to move domains to the registrar in my country. It's just not safe to do any business abroad, when I can't go to the court in case of anything happens and all my property could be seized if someone wouldn't like actions of my government.

Reply


@justsomehnguy 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I guess Namecheap is on my list of opinionated companies ie they are in notallowedlist now.

Also some things to think about:

People who don't have access to their e-mail right now wouldn't even know they would be "asked to move". In the 21st century this probably means people who can't read the e-mail are in the hospital, e.g. after a traffic accident or on a ventilator with COVID. Imagine going to coma/whatever around Feb 15, recover somewhat in the first weeks of March to encounter all your digital life was wiped from the Internet (despite being paid on time).

People who hosted their e-mail on a domain hosted on Namecheap would lose the ability to receive the e-mails (if for any reason wouldn't make it in time), which could greatly complicate the whole moving process. Giving the NamecheapCEO gave only 5 day to move out this is pretty contradicts their "please kindly fuc^W get out".

Given the majority of Namecheap support is located in Ukraine I highly doubt all these "[Russians,] contact us, we'll make exceptions" would go well.

And finally, riding a high horse is always good, but I doubt NamecheapCEO paid 1700 Ukrainian employees the same salary he would paid to 1700 US employees. Sure, this is not "Don't cut in my profits", but while the horse is high - it stinks.

EDIT: oh, and I really want them to publish the stats on how many people moved the domains from them in the next week, with at least Russia/non-Russia owned break-up.

But something tells me we wont see that.

EDIT2: Ha! To add insult to injury the guy could be literally locked up for actively participating in protests against the war![0]

[0] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=30505604

Reply


@csisnett 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I don't agree with this, businesses and regular people buy domains, if you want to ban government accounts or affiliated accounts that's one thing but to kick people in such a short notice is not ok

Reply


@effnamecheap 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Simply an American, and I’ll be moving my dozen domains off of Namecheap.

Attacking random Russians for something you don’t like of their leader is as dumb as post-9/11 Sikh bashing or interning German/Italian/Japanese after Pearl Harbor and the war declaration.

Way to make a shit situation worse.

Reply


@diebeforei485 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

As a Namecheap user for nearly a decade now, I support this decision. Perhaps you should have given 14 days - but other than that relatively minor point you absolutely made the right call here.

Reply


@literal_me 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Received the same email. I'm based in Lithuania and I have a Russian first name. No Russian addresses, IPs, billing info etc (because I have never been there!). How do you even select people to target with this? It's past midnight, I'm trying to figure out my options here. How exactly do the Euros I pay you from EU contribute to the Russian aggression?

Reply


@JVillella 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I would bet this causes more harm to innocent people than frustration to the Russian regime.

Why not do something more targeted? E.g. take down domains that are related to the government, propaganda, etc.

As can be seen in the HN community, Russian tech workers are the likely the least influenced by propaganda and do support Ukraine. With this service termination however, they're most impacted.

At the very least, please give people an extension. March 31? Innocent Russians are going through a lot right now.

Reply


@fromeroj 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I support your stance on this. looking forward for you to stop providing services to Israel, Saudi Arabia, USA, for the same resons.

Reply


@olegious 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm a Russian American living in the US, with family in both Russia and Ukraine. I spend hundreds of dollars a year on your services. I'm transferring my domains away from Namecheap due to this policy.

The sanctions and these types of actions don't hurt the Putin regime, they hurt individual Russians that are by a wide margin against this war and are being arrested by the thousands in daily protests.

Furthermore they ignore the geopolitical realities that underpin this war- there are no good guys here other than the civilians in Ukraine and Russia but plenty of bad guys in leadership in Russia, US and Ukraine itself that are responsible for this conflict festering for the last 20 years.

Reply


@nojonestownpls 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Alternative services mentioned in this thread (I'm merely collecting them to one place, can't vouch for any of their future neutrality or lack thereof):

* Cloudflare

* Gandi

* Njal.la

* nic.ru (apparently the Russian state-owned registrar)

* "It's time to decentralize." https://ens.domains https://ipfs.io/

* ~~Tucows~~ see below

* Hover.com

Please add any other that you know of that you have reason to believe would remain geopolitically neutral and reliable.

Reply


@c-smile 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Blindly distinguishing people by nationality is the first step to Nazism.

Being a Ukrainian by myself I'd like to tell you that your statement is extremely bad idea.

Reply


@metabagel 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Reportedly, half a million refugees are fleeing the war in Ukraine.

I agree with Namecheap stopping service of Russian domains.

Reply


@fck_ 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Dear Customer Support, have you ever personally risked your life to make a coup against authoritarian government? Look at how many Russians sit in jail for trying to speak up against Putin! These people get raped in jail, their children grow up without parents and food!

Just google “ russian jail rape leaks” and check out yourself how the Russian government treats ANYORN WHO DARES TO OPPOSE!

It’s so fucking easy to sit in a comfort of your own home in a democratic country where you don’t get killed for going against your own government!

I would be happy to take a look how you would be ready to make a coup when you have little children who will die if you get thrown in jail for joining demonstrations!

You have such a fucking one sided point of view. Use your brains for once or come to Russia and try to join demonstrations - you will get a front row seat to heaven because you will get beaten, thrown to jail, raped and killed. If you are lucky, you will only get beaten up.

Fuck you.

Reply


@modzu 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

well im not russian but perhaps i should take my domains off namecheap nonetheless. punishing innocent civilians?? fuck this loser virtue signalling ceo

Reply


@dmitrygr 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

How is this supposed to help? Ok, i get the virtue signaling angle, but seriously. What do you expect? That people want domains so much that they'll drop everything, abandon their families, kids, jobs, and go rise up against a well-defended president who'll jail or kill them for protesting?

This does NOTHING to help Ukraine, hurts INNOCENT Russians, and makes you look good in the eyes of only the least attentive....

So...why?

Reply


@fourstar 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Been a customer for 12 years. Will be transferring all my domains out. Get woke; go broke. Your meaningless ban does nothing.

Reply


@mattymf 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Interesting. Didn't expect Namecheap would start looking like a forbidden fruit

Reply


@hankman86 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

The point is very much to create additional cost and disruption for the Russian economy. Namecheap’s step doesn’t do much in this regard, but perhaps it convinces other services to follow suit and stop doing business with Russian entities. After all, it’s the Russian economy that pays for the war. Whatever creates a competitive disadvantage for a Russian companies will subsequently harm their revenue stream and the tax they’re due.

For the record: Nobody with a sane state of mind believes that the Russian people are “evil” or guilty of their leadership’s atrocities in Ukraine. They just happen to be the subjects of an authoritarian government and an onslaught of propaganda. At best, one could say that far too many are complicit and too few stand up to Putin. But admittedly, it’s a tough ask for people to protest a government that murders journalists and poisons opposition politicians.

Reply


@NCUserSince2010 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Lol, I also received this message. I've lived in Poland for the past 31 years and am also busy volunteering with help to Ukrainian refugees. I never voted for anything related to Russia, because I'm not a registered voter - I don't have a "propiska" (legal address in Russia) since 1995. Very incompetent move, Mr. CEO of Namecheap. I understand you want to get likes on social media and get rich on this hype. Instead I'd recommend donating money to real causes, like help on the Ukrainian border, food, medicine, migration attorneys. Your move is empty and stupid.

Reply


@chernevik 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I appreciate the sentiment, but I think this is very problematic in the case of DNS, because it is so important as a backbone of communication.

(I am by no means a networking expert. My understanding is that while people can run DNS servers of their own, they still must ultimately register their domain name somewhere.)

First, I worry this will increase Russian users' exposure to monitoring and censorship by the regime. After all, if all foreign DNS services do this, Russian customers will have no alternative but Russian DNS services, which will be far more vulnerable to control and/or infiltration by the government. Won't the government be able to tap local DNS providers to see which IP addresses are looking up dissident sites? Won't it be able to track who is looking up email address domains? Perhaps who is sending what emails to who?

Helping people obtain DNS service _outside_ Russian jurisdiction seems more damaging to the Putin regime.

Second, communication is of particular importance in its nature, even when some of the parties are abhorrent. Communication enables and fosters debate and learning. It provides access to alternative sources of information, of particular importance in a propaganda state like Russia. DNS is basically a phone book that enables contact among parties, right? If all DNS providers take the view of Namecheap these Russian parties are thrown out of the phone book. There is no communication with them, no exchange of ideas or information, no possibility of reasoning with them or changing their mind.

It is in the nature of communication that sometimes the people you are communicating with are fascist militaristic assholes. Even if we could reliably determine who those assholes are (I grant, right now it's pretty clear), cutting them out of the conversation entirely doesn't seem good for anyone. The assholes can't learn what they're doing wrong if they aren't talking to anyone else. And sometimes (again, unlikely to be this time) it turns out that _we_ are the asshole.

Third, it isn't clear how bright these lines really are. I grant, right now it's quite clear that Russia is a bad actor. But what about about China, with its treatment of the Uighurs and Hong Kong? Or the US with its invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan? (Which, btw, I supported.). Or Israel, Iran, Pakistan, India -- about any one of which someone could (and does) plausibly argue is engaged in crimes against humanity. Once we start kicking people out of the "you can talk" club, we'll be endlessly arguing which people to kick out. Better not to start.

It won't do to say, "they can get domain name service from someone else". If _all_ providers take this position, these players are out of the conversation. And if this is the right position, all providers _should_ take this position.

I deplore what Russia is doing in Ukraine and hope its invasion fails. I hope the Putin regime collapses to be replaced by a truly democratic one. And I'm all for economic sanctions generally -- stop buying Russian energy, stop banking transactions, stop buying their goods. By all means, stop helping Russia finance its invasion.

But communication is a special case. I think this kind of exclusion is contrary to human communication, and potentially bad for Russian dissidents. I hope Namecheap will reconsider.

Reply


@werth 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

It's funny how human brain works (or mine anyway). Russian living in the UK, got the same email. While I hate Putin, and understand this decision, still seeing this makes me think "f*k you Namecheap and all your Ukrainian employees". Go figure.

Reply


@voldacar 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm fascinated by this world we're living in now, with its seemingly total mobilization of all aspects of life in service of some politics or another. Where does this go, ultimately? What is the end state?

Reply


@alexklark 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Wow, cancel culture come to the nations level. Can you cancel France please, they do nasty things in Africa right now, and Black Lives Matters. But anyway, breach of contract pretty nasty thing, you will probably get class action ed sometimes later. Client can be a corporation with real lawyers.

Reply


@pharos92 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Punishing every day Russians is a pretty low blow to be perfectly frank. I get what you're doing here, it's a great virtue signal and all, but the only people you're actually impacting are everyday businesses and people that generally don't give a flying fuck what the government does. I'll be pulling all my services off your platform, purely because you've demonstrated that you project your own moral authority over the business, which is unpredictable. Regardless of my own personal views of anti-war and anti-foreign-interference.

Reply


@just-tom 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Time to create a decentralized registrar. Is that even possible?

Reply


@fulvioterzapi 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Virtue signaling at its best.

By the same standards, Namecheap shouldn’t be doing business with customers in the USA, given the horrendous track record of aggressions started by the USA.

Reply


@JVillella 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Can you redirect traffic to anti-propaganda news articles :)

Reply


@unlimit 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I don't think I can agree with this as a customer. I mean did namecheap block customer from US (because of Iraq/Afghanistan etc etc), France (Africa) and other countries?

This is just cheap.

Reply


@rganeyev 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I am a Russian citizen from birth who permanently lives and works in the UK. I do not support Russian regime in any way and offered my help with relocation to Russian and Ukrainian citizens from the start - see my post in LinkedIn. On namecheap I hold non-ru related domain paid till February 2023.

So what the heck they are blaming me for being Russian and terminating the contract without any agreement?

Reply


@lr4444lr 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I find it morally troubling that we accept sanctions and private company trade withdrawals like this, yet we clamor about the evil of collective punishment. It's a matter of degree, not kind, and where do we draw the line?

Reply


@pasquinelli 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

i wonder what other countries have gotten this treatment? as an american, should i worry about getting kicked off my webhost the next time we start a war of aggression?

Reply


@vytvy 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Enough is enough for Russia and customers from there. This is just a beginning, You and your Hitler=Putin started WW3 in Ukraine. Your leader is telling the world that he is ready to nuke Ukraine or any NATo country or US if someone will try to do anything to him or help save people in ukraine that your soldiers are killing. So yea, if businesses and society won't step in and stop sponsoring Russia which is killing and bombing people, so any business that don't want to touch bloody money, they should stop providing all services to Russia. Feel the pain for not doing anything with your Hitler with nukes and causing a war in europe.

Reply


@Saris 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

6 days is not much time to give people to move.

Reply


@EdwardSSS 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Hi @NamecheapCEO! What do you say about Belarusian citizens? they are also terminated? Who remember 2020 year in Belarus? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020%E2%80%932021_Belarusian_p...) Now almost all of Belarus supports Ukraine, there are guys who went to help the army of Ukraine. On 27/02 practically everyone who even went out with a flag was detained by the police. I would not like to see "deplatforming" based on what the government is doing. It would be a great shame for ordinary citizens....

Reply


@asats 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Not living in Russia (moved because of the government oppression) apparently is not sufficient to not be hit by this ban, just having any russia-related information gets you kicked out looks like. Really great move by them.

Reply


@cassonmars 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is deeply concerning, as many have echoed, because you’re punishing people who are already on your side, for the most part. But it’s also concerning because you claim it’s not deplatforming as other registrars exist. Do you not think they will not follow your lead? Do you intend that only when a country violates human rights in the particular way that happened here that the aggressor’s country will be removed? I cannot know this, but what I can know is you’ve stated you will remove people this time, and hand waved it away as “not deplatforming.” No amount of mental gymnastics will make that not true. Even Cloudflare owned what they did when they removed 8chan. Either way, I have hundreds of domains on Namecheap, and now I’m thinking I’ll need to find a new registrar, lest the track record of the US be something I as a conscientious objecting citizen be held accountable for.

Reply


@fleddr 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is essentially a non-governmental sanction that is severely lacking any moral basis.

If you would be directly targeting the domains of the Russian administration itself, or its main beneficiaries (oligarchs) you might have a point, but those are not typical namecheap customers I imagine.

So those affected are small businesses and citizens where you assume some type of guilt or complacency simply based on them being Russian. Because indirectly they are contributing tax revenue to the regime.

That's a really low bar. If we would extend that logic and consistently apply it, Russians should be banned from healthcare and food too.

Further, the idea that all this added sanction pressure will get citizens to rise up against the regime is quite an arrogant one to make. As if risking your life to rise up is the least one can do. The pile of sanctions may even worsen the outcome and make Putin even more motivated.

I think it's a reckless, emotional, ad hoc move.

Reply


@exizt88 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

As far as I can tell, Namecheap's support team (which has always been excellent) is mostly based in Ukraine. And I understand how difficult it must be to find a way to reconcile this with the fact that Namecheap has customers in Russia. Which is further complicated by the fact that some of the Russian users actively oppose Putin's regime and depend on Namecheap as a company.

And, of course, I do realize that whatever's going on with Russian customers is in no way comparable to the suffering that the Ukrainian members of the customer support team live through every day as the war goes on.

This is a very hard situation, and I hope Namecheap finds some way to resolve it (hopefully a better one that they've found for now).

Reply


@karaterobot 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

The loss of tax revenue is not going to be large enough for anyone in Russia to even hear about it, but the ordinary people who lose hosting or have to change registrars will suffer in some small, appreciable way. I'll give Namecheap the benefit of the doubt and say their heart is in the right place, but this is not a productive action for them to take.

Reply


@brackbert 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I have been a Namecheap customer for over 10 years and use them for my business websites. I will be moving away from them. I do not support Russia because I am vehemently anti-war, especially after what I've seen my own country do to countries like Iraq and Afghanistan. However, I cannot support a business that will target and cancel customer based on their race or ethnicity. Who knows who will be the next group that is targeted and canceled.

Reply


@possiblydrunk 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Completely understandable, within their rights, and highly symbolic. With so many Ukranian employees, what else would the CEO do? Sadly, though, it's just another punitive act that will hurt more people than it will help. Not clear that doing something is always better than doing nothing, even in war. Whatever you do should make things better. If not, keep thinking about what you can do that will actually make a positive difference.

Reply


@fromtheurals 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I am your customer. You have requested me to move my domain to another provider.

I condemn this regime's war against Ukraine, and I will comply with your request. It is a small inconvenience compared to a disastrous tragedy that is happening before our eyes.

But you could provide us with a way to pay some sum instead of transferring our domains, so that you could donate to provide humanitarian relief to the suffering people of Ukraine. It's a bit dangerous to donate directly, you know.

Reply


@warner_of_doom 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

You are just like the hacking group `Anonymous`.

You will target easy prey like Russia, but you would never dare to go up against your lord and master, my country, the USA -- even when it does something wrong.

Reply


@jacktribe 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I am completely in support of this. Hopefully the Russian people understand that these types of measures are not taken because we are trying to exact revenge on them as a people.

This is our way to motivate you, to encourage you to go out in major cities and protest by the millions. More so than any other profession, we in tech are often shielded from major events happening in the outside world (see pandemic). We need to get off our asses and fight for what's right because we're not living in the metaverse yet.

Reply


@mandaman 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I understand the emotions at play and your inclination to support Ukraine, but blanket banning a country from your platform is not the answer.

This (1) adds to the incredible financial burden most normal, peace-loving Russians are in right now, (2) significantly erodes community trust in your platform, and (3) actually helps Putin on his quest to isolate his citizens from the Western-run half of the internet.

I have ~60 domains on Namecheap and have recommended you to my community for years. I can't, in good conscience, support a platform that makes sweeping generalizations/unilateral decisions like this. I urge you to reconsider.

Reply


@nathanaldensr 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

For all the innocent people across the world that just want to go along to get along while "us vs. them" thinkers close in from all sides, I just want to say that I empathize with you all. You're not alone.

Reply


@udia 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

The vast majority of NameCheap's employees are located in Ukraine https://www.namecheap.com/careers/

Reply


@muzika 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is just wrong, morally. Most of their Russian users don’t even support this war.

This discrimination has to stop.

Reply


@gchokov 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Cheap company, cheap move. You totally don’t get it. What a shame!

Reply


@FabHK 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Here my two cents as someone that has visited, lived in, or good friends in authoritarian regimes such as East Germany, Russia, North Korea, Iran, Hong Kong:

- in a democracy, the population is responsible for what the government does. Conversely, the more authoritarian the regime, arguably the less culpable the population is. (Of course, people shouldn't have allowed an authoritarian figure to gain power... indeed. But frankly, those who live in glass houses should not throw stones.)

- it is imperative to distinguish between the government and the people, in particular in very authoritarian regimes. Sometimes the population is behind their government, sometimes they aren't.

- here, it seems to me that many Russians (and quite possibly the majority) are increasingly critical and sick of Putin, and, as far as I can tell, most are, like the rest of the world, against this war.

- who suffers most from this war are ordinary Ukrainians, obviously. However, I venture to say, most ordinary Russians suffer, too.

- thus, as far as possible, our sanctions should be laser focused at targeting Putin and his collaborators, the inner circle, government, and companies close to the government.

Reply


@slavicpeople 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

What was required to prove - the ukranian are nazis, the nazis that as in ww2 discriminated by nation and now fascism is flourishing in Ukraine, the world will not forget the genocide that you have set up in Donbass. Just google the children of Donbass and you will find facts and pictures of these Nazis smiling in front of bombs with captions All for Children. Fuk Ukraine, fuk usa

Reply


@jackmoore 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm a Namecheap customer and I support your decision.

Reply


@throwaway164610 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I'm canceling my Namecheap services as well and will forever not recommend you. Corporate activism is one of the worst evils in our society and I won't support it.

This line of behavior only leads to ruin. Leave the fighting to the military.

Reply


@lyx0 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I want to add to my former comment here [1] that I transferred my domain from namecheap when I saw this thread and the CEOs response on (28th Februar) and then afterwards was met with an automated email reply that left me actually stunning:

-------------------------------

"STANDARDIZED FORM OF AUTHORIZATION

DOMAIN NAME TRANSFER - Confirmation of Registrar Transfer Request

Attention: Redacted for Privacy Re: Transfer of [domain]

received notification on 2/28/2022 at [timestamp] PM that you have requested a transfer to another domain registrar.

If you WANT TO PROCEED with this transfer, you do not need to respond to this message. If you WISH TO CANCEL the transfer, please go to our website

If we do not hear from you by 3/5/2022 at [timestamp] PM, the transfer will proceed.

If you have any questions about this process, please contact support@namecheap.com"

-------------------------------

3/5/2022 is one day off your proposed limit here, therefore I suppose if I wouldn't have reacted in the first one or two hours since it was published I would have had to choose a new domain registrar, start the transfer and pray to god it would be accepted before the limit ran out?

But still, I am completely ignoring the ability for you to actually pay back your customers In the case of any refunds in that timeframe in case of any current or new sanctions. I am curious how are you going to pay back your russian customers in a week when you cannot just press refund or type in their IBAN for the money they paid you? Are you going to send them a letter with [currency]?

I dm'ed namecheaps Twitter account, but I got no response. I publically @ed your Twitter handle since I was in disbelief that NamechepCEO was actually your CEO and got no response. I know this has just been a few hours but I lost all believe in your company.

I probably wouldn't have made your company much money, or would I have made much impact since it is just my personal email domain.. But this email domain means a lot to me since it is my personal familiyname domain and can't be easiliy changed. This is also why I wrote this comment, I may not bring you much value, but this domain brings me a ton of value and I'd hate to lose it.

[1] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=30507523

Reply


@tguvot 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Given that Russian vodka is blacklisted from stores in USA (and Finland!) and replaced with message "we stand with Ukraine", it's not really surprising.

I read interview with somebody from Russia yesterday, russian tracks getting their tires punctured in EU and get stuck because credit cards don't work anymore. Ships refuse to offload goods in Russian ports and drop them of "wherever in Europe". Russian companies can't buy/rent containers to bring goods to Russia.

It's a lot of collateral damage.

On the other side my brothers in law family in Kharkiv sleeps in hallway for past few days while outside blow up cluster munition delivered by MLRS systems https://twitter.com/YWNReporter/status/1498271572292952064?s...

Edit: just to add, I myself was born in Kyiv. Company where I work now has officies both in Ukraine (in one of hotter places) and in russia. I am equally trying to help my colleagues from both offices to GTFO. Collateral damage is unfortunate for private person but frankly not surprising. What is "surprising" it's that a big chunk of Russian population is surprised by it

Reply


@austhrow743 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Anyone know some good registrars that have made it clear through either lack of action or statement that they're willing to keep providing service to people they find repugnant and only cease service when legally required?

Reply


@jounker 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

Well done sir. Thank you for standing up for your employees.

Reply


@vzaliva 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

This is a good move. As Ukrainian before the war broke, I tried to convince my Russian contacts to do something about it. At least publicly state that they are against the war. Exactly one (!) out of my ~50 Russian Facebook "friends" wrote a public post. Now, as my fellow citizens die under Russian bombs, I consider all who stayed silent complicit. Unless they personally feel the consequences of their government actions, Putin will continue to commit more crimes with their silent approval.

Reply


@nojonestownpls 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

It's ironic that some people are using "whataboutism" as some trump card argument when people compare this actions of other countries, and in some cases linking to the Wikipedia article, when the article itself [1] points out:

> Those who use whataboutism are not necessarily engaging in an empty or cynical deflection of responsibility: whataboutism can be a useful tool to expose contradictions, double standards, and hypocrisy.

And even notes that people have "criticized the usage of accusations of whataboutism by American news outlets, arguing that accusations of whataboutism have been used to simply deflect criticisms of human rights abuses perpetrated by the United States or its allies."

Whataboutism has meaning only in a specific context, and is not a mallet to beat down anyone who points out any double standard you're uncomfortable with.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whataboutism

Reply


@IntenseChaos 4 months

Replying to @exizt88 🎙

I have been with Namecheap for at least 10 years, probably much longer. Not Russian or Ukrainian or anything remotely similar. I applaud your courage and the fact that you were willing to take such a stance despite the effect this will likely have on your revenues. We need more companies like this. Thank you!

Reply


About Us

site design / logo © 2022 Box Piper