Hacker News Re-Imagined

Bits of advice I wish I had known

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  • 2 months ago

  • @npalli
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Bits of advice I wish I had known


@NickRandom 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Great list indeed - but he forgot the 'Trust Me on the Sunscreen' line.

(Ref to a Baz Luhrman hit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdQbb3FXSEI)

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@smudgy 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Let me add one that's not on the list:

"The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you."

- M. G. Scott

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@WillAdams 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

All of this advice stuff always ignores one brutal truth, which I wish I had learned when I was much younger:

Your life will become the accumulation and consequences of every decision you make which cannot be changed --- never make a lasting decision without considering all the consequences.

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@gunnihinn 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> 103 Bits of Advice I Wish I Had Known

Not one of them being "edit your writing".

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@bambax 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> When you are stuck, explain your problem to others. Often simply laying out a problem will present a solution.

This is true, except the to others part isn't really necessary. It works just as well if you try to reformulate the problem for yourself.

Many times, just trying to think of a good way to ask something on StackOverflow priduces a solution.

It even works when trying to write a good search query on Google.

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@ipsin 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

"Speak confidently as if you are right, but listen carefully as if you are wrong."

I hate-hate-hate this advice. When I assert something confidently, I'm willing to put money on it.

The first time I ran into someone I respected who was confidently wrong, it threw me for a loop. It makes you seem like a blowhard bullshitter! Guessing is fine, but say it's a guess.

Edited to add: I suppose this is a variant of Cunningham's Law, but I still hate it.

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@yc-kraln 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Whenever there is an argument between two sides, find the third side.

Curious to know the third side with regards to clear victim/aggressor situations (domestic violence, x*phobia, Russia in Ukraine, etc.)

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@maerF0x0 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Courtesy costs nothing. Lower the toilet seat after use. Let the people in the elevator exit before you enter. Return shopping carts to their designated areas. When you borrow something, return it better shape (filled up, cleaned) than when you got it.

Sorry, this one depends on the old "if everyone would just..." It does cost something, and it's the price we ought to be willing to pay for a civil society. But it's also long been non-reciprocated (in my experience) and so I'm done with self sacrifice in the name of the common good (to the extent I can untrain it out of myself).

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@gregwebs 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> If your opinions on one subject can be predicted from your opinions on another, you may be in the grip of an ideology. When you truly think for yourself your conclusions will not be predictable.

Most people seem to think it’s a sign of consistency and want to belong to a tribe. This piece of advice needs a lot of repeating.

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@adamredwoods 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

>> Dont purchase extra insurance if you are renting a car with a credit card.

Some credit cards no longer offer coverage. Some recently removed some benefits, so check to make sure.

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@jimt1234 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Here's one I would add: "Go to jail." Seriously. I spent a weekend in jail when I was about 19. So many life lessons learned in such a short time.

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@pedrodelfino 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Pure gold. Content like this reminds me of the "favorite" feature available on HN. I will try to read this article a few times during the year. I should have used this "favorite feature" more often. Btw, I love HN. Thanks for sharing!

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@musicale 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Anything you say before the word “but” does not count.

"but" does not count.

TFTFY

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@jaqalopes 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

"Dont keep making the same mistakes; try to make new mistakes" damn this one really hit me. So easy to stay in my comfort zone when there's so much else I could do.

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@EVa5I7bHFq9mnYK 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

>> Dont purchase extra insurance if you are renting a car with a credit card.

Is it really a thing? I also heard this from other people, but it's hard for me to believe that CC company will really pay out in case of an insurance case. After all, their commission for renting a car is 2-3%, and car rent companies charge 50-100% of the rental price for insurance.

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@amelius 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Add:

- If you have spinach or any green leafy vegetables, carrot, turnip or celery, avoid reheating them. These nitrate rich vegetables when heated again can turn toxic, releasing carcinogenic properties, which are generally cancerous in nature.

- Some fruit juices and fruits (most notably grapefruit) can interact with numerous drugs, in many cases causing adverse effects.

- Floss.

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@Simon_O_Rourke 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Seems to lean into the "hotel tips and tricks".

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@whiddershins 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> • Keep all your things visible in a hotel room, not in drawers, and all gathered into one spot. That way you’ll never leave anything behind. If you need to have something like a charger off to the side, place a couple of other large items next to it, because you are less likely to leave 3 items behind than just one.

Even better rule: never, ever, unplug a device from a charger in a hotel room without unplugging the charger from the wall at the same time. Put it back in your bag.

No other rule for chargers has ever worked for any frequent traveler I’ve known.

Edit: Unplug the charger from the wall first, then the device from the charger.

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@nine_k 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

The list is not all solid pieces of advice, or even mostly. But each item is thought-provoking, which is indeed valuable: even when you completely disagree, you think why you disagree.

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@nomilk 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Whenever there is an argument between two sides, find the third side.

A more apposite version of 'think outside the square'.

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@lr4444lr 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Aim to die broke. Give to your beneficiaries before you die; it’s more fun and useful. Spend it all. Your last check should go to the funeral home and it should bounce

No.

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@jfdi 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

This is beautiful thank you

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@fny 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Take risks in life, but not ones that are too big to recover from.

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@taco_emoji 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Dont ever work for someone you dont want to become

Can't say I really understand this one. Wanting to become somebody else sounds like insecurity to me.

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@musicale 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Copying others is a good way to start. Copying yourself is a disappointing way to end.

If people are paying to hear the hits, you should play them. It's part of the job.

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@samjanis 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Nice list. Some hit the spot, others miss. Not sure if the author is trying to be funny with points 7 and 8:

> Anything you say before the word “but” does not count.

> When you forgive others, they may not notice, but you will heal. Forgiveness is not something we do for others; it is a gift to ourselves.

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@DeathArrow 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

>If you loan someone $20 and you never see them again because they are avoiding paying you back, that makes it worth $20.

What if they are back, asking for other $20?

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@depaya 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> To rapidly reveal the true character of a person you just met, move them onto an abysmally slow internet connection. Observe.

I like to think of myself as a levelheaded and rational person, but nothing gets me enraged more than barely working technology.

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@lifeplusplus 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Thank you!!! I've read 400 pages long self help books covering only 3 of these points.. so much better in this format

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@musicale 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Don't bother fighting the old; just build the new.

People love it when something they depend on is shut down and replaced with something new, incomplete, and buggy.

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@bspear 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> No one is as impressed with your possessions as you are

Reminds me of: if you own a Porsche, all I know is that you're $120K less rich

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@notRobot 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

I love this list, but:

> • To keep young kids behaving on a car road trip, have a bag of their favorite candy and throw a piece out the window each time they misbehave.

Please don't do this. Animals and birds can choke and die on candy. And even if they don't, the ingredients are often toxic to them.

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@rmason 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

As someone bearing down on age seventy I have to tell younger folks these resonate with me. A few are even new to me, like the 4 second rule when meeting people.

If you like Kevin Kelly he has a weekly newsletter of recommendations, mostly on products he finds useful called Recommendo that I highly recommend.

https://www.getrevue.co/profile/Recomendo/

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@AprEaL 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Anything you say before the word “but” does not count.

Quite right.

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@badrabbit 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Almost funny how I find myself disagreeing with almost every single advice on the list.

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@cbtacy 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Great summary, great lessons, definitely something worth fully digesting and internalizing.

But to be fair (and pedantic), at least one is untrue.

> • Handy measure: the distance between your fingertips of your outstretched arms at shoulder level is your height.

Ape Index = the difference between your arm span at shoulder level and your height. In other words, a +6" Ape Index means your arm span is 6 inches more than your height.

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@mark_l_watson 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Great stuff. First suggestion list that I finished reading in years.

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@bfors 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Amazing list, and one of the best things I've found on HN. I'll add my own bit of advice, for fun:

The party is over the instant one person asks for the wifi password

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@efitz 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

• Criticize in private, praise in public.

I’ve always lived by this one.

Bridgewater corporation takes the opposite of this approach and is lauded for it. The idea is that you get better results by saying what you think honestly but respectfully.

Maybe it works there, but I’ve worked with ex Bridgewater people and they’re toxic. Evidently it’s very hard to develop the social skills to give public criticism in a way that doesn’t erode trust. Such feedback often comes across as callous and sometimes disrespectful.

Withholding approval/praise in public; tentativeness, etc., will convey the message to socially perceptive folks, while not conveying to others that you support bad plans/designs/ideas.

Not everyone is socially perceptive, and even for those who are, it’s always good to follow up in private where you can convey your concerns while being respectful- in a 1:1 you can take the time needed to ensure that you get across that you’re concerned with the idea, not the person; you often don’t have the time for that in meetings and besides even if you’re 100% right the other person could lose “face” with others. Yes maybe they already did with their statements, but you don’t need to compound it.

Also the other effort is cohesion. If you are part of a team they WILL lose trust in you quickly if you frequently side with “others” (against your team) in meetings, regardless of whether you’re correct.

Closely related is “don’t try to always win” against someone who you need a long term relationship with. If you always win, you’re in a relationship with a loser. Or you’re an asshole. Or both.

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@eyelidlessness 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Intentionally ignoring prior discussion because I don’t want it to color my response: a lot of this is really empty or reacts to incentives I don’t have, but some of it is very good general advice:

> If you stop to listen to a musician or street performer for more than a minute, you owe them a dollar.

> Courtesy costs nothing

My only note is I’d expand this to generally accepting people how they express themselves and their cares

> Efficiency is highly overrated; Goofing off is highly underrated. Regularly scheduled sabbaths, sabbaticals, vacations, breaks, aimless walks and time off are essential for top performance of any kind. The best work ethic requires a good rest ethic.

Two years into burnout, this x1000.

> Criticize in private, praise in public.

Mostly right on but sometimes public criticism is the only effective tool to right things that are otherwise wrong, or just necessary because the wrong is entirely immovable without public attention.

> If winning becomes too important in a game, change the rules to make it more fun. Changing rules can become the new game.

This is fantastic, please enjoy.

I stopped here because I am very hungry.

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@ggm 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Criticize in private, praise in public.

I broke this one, and it broke a 10 year friendship which took another 5 to heal, and I decided to stop pretending to be a manager. This is a rule of life not to break if you can avoid it. Almost irreparable harm done.

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@jstanley 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> When speaking to an audience it’s better to fix your gaze on a few people than to “spray” your gaze across the room. Your eyes telegraph to others whether you really believe what you are saying.

Please don't do this. It's incredibly uncomfortable to be the one person in the audience that the speaker is staring at.

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@yef 1 month

Replying to @npalli 🎙

I kept looking for a spoiler saying that these glib, seemingly-profound sentences were generated by GPT-3.

Don't work for someone you wouldn't want to become? How on earth is someone supposed to determine that during a standard interview process? What are you supposed to do when teams get shuffled around, or your boss leaves? To say nothing of the fact that you can admire someone without wanting to become them.

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@prmph 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Anything you say before the word “but” does not count.

Not sure I agree with this one at all. It irks me a lot when caveats I put in arguments are ignored, and the other party assumes that I don't really mean them. This happens a lot (even on HN, see the responses to my comments at [1] and [2]), and causes a lot of straw-man arguments and talking past each other.

Caveats are important and should not be ignored and should be evaluated on their own merits, because they could be an intrinsic part of the argument being made.

1. https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=31156271

2. https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=29185739

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@ngngngng 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Purchase the most recent tourist guidebook to your home town or region. You’ll learn a lot by playing the tourist once a year.

This is a great idea, though I try and keep the same principle in mind. I grew up in a very popular tourist area and never visited anything of interest, so I started consciously enjoying where I live and going out of my way to discover new things as if I were a tourist.

> No one is as impressed with your possessions as you are.

Does anyone else get a kick out of "hiding" your wealth? Obviously every Dave Ramsey enthusiast, but I guess I sort of fit in there as well. I wear the cheapest Casio G-shock (love that thing) and drive a 10 year old economy car. I allow myself many luxuries but almost none that communicate wealth to random onlookers.

> If you repeated what you did today 365 more times will you be where you want to be next year?

Oh, that's fun. I've been adding a bit of stoicism into my life. Reminders that I might die today etc. I think I'll throw this one in the mix and see if it alters my behavior.

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@trustfundbaby 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> A great way to understand yourself is to seriously reflect on everything you find irritating in others.

This is one of the truest things I've ever read.

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@gardenhedge 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

"If you stop to listen to a musician or street performer for more than a minute, you owe them a dollar"

How is this advice that you wished you had known? I honestly stopped reading after this one.

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@DeathArrow 1 month

Replying to @npalli 🎙

I don't get why people are so upset about some particular piece of advice KK generously shared with us.

You don't have to absolutely agree with the author. It's best to take anything through the filter of your own mind. Find pros and cons, think about if it works or not and why.

But most outraged persons are so because the piece of advices don't match their particular view of the world. They don't spend time thinking, they hurry to show outrage, mostly invoking some kind of injustice.

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@zivkovicp 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you.

I often do this but it rarely results in healthy dialog, I don't look for answers in online _forums_ too often anyway. :D

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@mrblampo 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Author wishes they'd known not to ask a woman if she's pregnant. That cannot have been a pleasant experience.

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@abel_ 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

I wonder what the net effect of such pieces of writing is. The problem is that these abstract and contextless statements make sense only if they cause the reader to reflect on some experience, and thus only mildly reinforce currently held beliefs. Otherwise, I can't see how the statements would stick for most people (not even as cached memory).

What would add significantly to this is a bunch of Gwern-style links embedded within each of these quips. The author is clearly speaking from a vantage point not many others have attained, and he'd be able to provide a story or other context to each.

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@daenz 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

>Anything you say before the word “but” does not count.

That's a funny one, and I agree, and it's also the reason I use "and" instead of "but" for those kinds of sentences. It sounds a little clunkier, but(!) it doesn't trigger people's alarms.

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@nakedgremlin 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

I love Kevin's life lists, but it always feels overwhelming to parse through. Too much lovely nuggets to internalize.

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@shahbaby 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

"The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you."

Nowadays if you try that on reddit you'll probably just get downvotes and sarcastic replies.

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@photochemsyn 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Every list like this should probably end with a final line:

Take all advice anyone gives you with a large grain of salt. In the end, you are the one who will be making the decisions that change your life in one way or the other. If you can't trust yourself to make the right decision, then who can you trust? At the very least, you'll have noone but yourself to blame if you happen to make the wrong one. Those are the mistakes you learn the most from, by the way.

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@garbagetime 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Good list IMO

>To keep young kids behaving on a car road trip, have a bag of their favorite candy and throw a piece out the window each time they misbehave

WTF

>You cant reason someone out of a notion that they didn’t reason themselves into.

You definitely can if they're the right kind of person.

>When someone tells you about the peak year of human history, the period of time when things were good before things went downhill, it will always be the years of when they were 10 years old — which is the peak of any human’s existence.

I believe he's showing his age with this one. I doubt many people born after 1999 believe that to be true.

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@julienreszka 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Terrible advices

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@pseudosavant 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Wow, this is so good. One of the best things I've read via HN.

Wisdom: "The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you."

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@asimovfan 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> A wise man said, “Before you speak, let your words pass through three gates. At the first gate, ask yourself, “Is it true?” At the second gate ask, “Is it necessary?” At the third gate ask, “Is it kind?”

it was the Buddha.

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@nojs 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Meta comment: I wish more older people would write things like this. Based on how much more I know now compared to 10 years ago, it’s hard to imagine how much wisdom a 70 year old must have about the way the world works. It’s so valuable.

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@Evan_Hellmuth 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> To keep young kids behaving on a car road trip, have a bag of their favorite candy and throw a piece out the window each time they misbehave.

This guy is my hero

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@bornfreddy 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Great list, but:

> To keep young kids behaving on a car road trip, have a bag of their favorite candy and throw a piece out the window each time they misbehave.

That's terrible advice. Treat children with respect! They are very smart, they just lack experience. If they "misbehave", talk to them and explain why this is not good. If you can't find an explanation, chances are you are wrong and you should reevaluate your position.

But never, never, never willfully hurt them by throwing away their favorite candy. So wrong on so many levels.

This was a big surprise for me in this list as I mostly agree with the items before it. Or, to use a previous item:

> You’ll get 10x better results by elevating good behavior rather than punishing bad behavior, especially in children and animals.

Well said.

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@the_only_law 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Your best job will be one that you were unqualified for because it stretches you. In fact only apply to jobs you are unqualified for.

Someone tell the other side.

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@no_time 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

>Dont bother fighting the old; just build the new.

This message has been brought to you by the freedesktop.org foundation.

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@ekianjo 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> 90% of everything is crap. If you think you don’t like opera, romance novels, TikTok, country music, vegan food, NFTs, keep trying to see if you can find the 10% that is not crap.

Meh. Finding the 10% is not free either - and the benefit of finding it not very tangible either.

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@hkwerf 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> The biggest lie we tell ourselves is “I dont need to write this down because I will remember it.”

I bookmarked the page and yet I will have forgotten about it tomorrow.

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@beckingz 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

"It’s thrilling to be extremely polite to rude strangers."

This is a powerful one. Simultaneously virtuous and incredibly petty.

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@musicale 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> There is no such thing as being “on time.” You are either late or you are early. Your choice.

CalTrain explained.

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@arkaic 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Buying used books is sage advice, but you should also support smaller authors from time to time as well by buying new

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@ekianjo 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Aim to die broke. Give to your beneficiaries before you die; it’s more fun and useful. Spend it all. Your last check should go to the funeral home and it should bounce.

Easier said than done, and I find this is bad advice. You don't really know how much runway you have in front of you and in a situation where you may have very limited income, your best bet is to save as much as possible. Also you will have unforeseen health-related expenses as you get old. Following this logic incurs a risk of make yourself depend on your kids or your family members before you die.

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@t0bia_s 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

- To keep young kids behaving on a car road trip, have a bag of their favorite candy and throw a piece out the window each time they misbehave.

This is good one!

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@shetill 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> find 12 people to love you

Am I Jesus or something?

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@quickthrower2 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

* register a 2 letter .org while they are still available

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@21723 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Some of these are good, some are bad, but this one is dangerous and unethical:

When checking references for a job applicant, employers may be reluctant or prohibited from saying anything negative, so leave or send a message that says, “Get back to me if you highly recommend this applicant as super great.” If they don’t reply take that as a negative.

When you flush a candidate on a reference check, there's a good chance that he'll figure out what happened, and justifiably become paranoid. He's going to assume someone deliberately ratfucked him, which is not necessarily what happened here--the person could have legitimately thought highly of the candidate, but forgotten to reply because the email came at an inconvenient time (or ended up in the spam folder). At the minimum, you're destroying someone's professional relationships, but if this is in an industry like Silicon Valley, where people have glowing references not because of sincerity but because everyone who matters retains a hit man to "fix" negative ones, you're putting people in danger of physical harm, including the possibility of death. Worst of all, since the candidate might not know which reference ratfucked him, you could end up getting someone innocent killed.

So, don't do this. The main function of reference checks is to ensure you're not getting someone who claims to have worked at Goldman Sachs or Google for 4 years but actually never set foot there. Leave it at that and be happy.

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@gundamdoubleO 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> When checking references for a job applicant, employers may be reluctant or prohibited from saying anything negative, so leave or send a message that says, “Get back to me if you highly recommend this applicant as super great.” If they don’t reply take that as a negative.

And what about the referees who either don't care and never reply or send canned responses to everything?

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@smeej 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you.

If HN ever needs a new motto!

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@koolba 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

This a great list but at least one of these is dangerous:

> When buying a garden hose, an extension cord, or a ladder, get one substantially longer than you think you need. It’ll be the right size.

Extension cords should be of the length being used. Using a substantially longer extension cord and keeping it coiled up in a neat pile can cause a fire. It’s meant to be stretched out to dissipate heat.

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@paulkre 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

There is no bigger flex than using a 2 letter domain name for your personal blog.

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@massysett 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

I’ll add one: there is limited time in life, and you cannot implement all the advice you’ll get about how to live a good life. A doctor will tell you to take care of your health. A sociable person will tell you to have friends. A traveler will tell you to travel. A priest will tell you to know God. A careerist will tell you to work harder. An entrepreneur will tell you to start a business. The list goes on and on and on.

Life is about what you decide to do, not about what others think you should do and certainly not about what some random old person says you should do because that’s what he wishes he did.

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@Taylor_OD 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

It's kind of funny how everyone seems to be reading this list until they hit one they disagree with them posting about it.

Good list. Not all of them are going to apply to everyone.

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@saberience 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

I'll be honest here, I found this list mostly banal and also not really actionable. I think anyone could generate a similar list with a few Google searches and many of these tips I have seen written by other others and this guy has just re-phrased them. Basically generic self-help.

I think a better option is to choose one particular thing you want to improve in yourself and have a focused plan to work on it. However this takes work and effort that most will never do. Reading a big list of 50 sentences will make zero difference to your life.

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@ask_b123 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Handy measure: the distance between your fingertips of your outstretched arms at shoulder level is your height.

What does this mean?

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@a1445c8b 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Protip: Always pay your taxes.

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@ehnto 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> When checking references for a job applicant, employers may be reluctant or prohibited from saying anything negative, so leave or send a message that says, “Get back to me if you highly recommend this applicant as super great.” If they don’t reply take that as a negative.

Big disagree here, that's not fair at all to the applicant. Some people are just terrible referees and it's hard to know that as the applicant until someone lets you down. Some people mean to reply but forget, some people are too busy to answer and don't get back to you, some people just don't want to even though they think you'd be an excellent candidate. On top of that, with people moving around so much it can be hard to nail down recent contact details.

If somewhere I'm applying to work can't get a hold of someone, I'd very much expect them to reach back out to me in order to resolve the issue, if they can't do me that courtesy then I guess I'll be working somewhere else.

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@ornornor 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> B[u]y used books. They have the same words as the new ones. Also libraries.

The library genesis is very useful in that regard, so is bookfinder.com

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@alkaloid 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

No one cares how many / what size TVs you have.

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@lgvld 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> If you stop to listen to a musician or street performer for more than a minute, you owe them a dollar.

Yes. Also if you take a picture.

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@immigrantheart 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> A wise man said, “Before you speak, let your words pass through three gates. At the first gate, ask yourself, “Is it true?” At the second gate ask, “Is it necessary?” At the third gate ask, “Is it kind?”

What is kind? I am the straight shooter type. In the past I've gotten critiques from people about the way I speak, but also told by some people that the way I speak is fine. Maybe people just prefer different things.

I myself prefer people speaking straight to me.

I think I am kind, but not nice.

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@A4ET8a8uTh0 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

<< Efficiency is highly overrated; Goofing off is highly underrated. Regularly scheduled sabbaths, sabbaticals, vacations, breaks, aimless walks and time off are essential for top performance of any kind. The best work ethic requires a good rest ethic.

Good grief, yes. When you are tired and burnt out, you find the worst kind of shortcuts.

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@testbjjl 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Well intentioned drivel…

• About 99% of the time, the right time is right now.

Home refinance? Travel during a pandemic?

• No one is as impressed with your possessions as you are.

Search HN for Elon Musk

• Dont ever work for someone you dont want to become.

Search HN for Musk, Gates, Jobs, Ellison, Dorsey, Graham, Thiel,

• Cultivate 12 people who love you, because they are worth more than 12 million people who like you.

If I knew 12 million people I would have little time for the 12, most likely just my immediate family and primarily offspring

• Dont keep making the same mistakes; try to make new mistakes.

Retirement plans come to mind. Relationships is another one where I don’t want new mistakes

• If you stop to listen to a musician or street performer for more than a minute, you owe them a dollar.

My dollar and a vote to value culture, people, art, expression even not to my liking. This applies to any creative endeavor to be consumed.

• Anything you say before the word “but” does not count.

I love ice cream, it it gives me gas.

• When you forgive others, they may not notice, but you will heal. Forgiveness is not something we do for others; it is a gift to ourselves.

Don’t learn to forgive. Learn to forget. Better yet learn to not become attached to become angry.

• Courtesy costs nothing. Lower the toilet seat after use. Let the people in the elevator exit before you enter. Return shopping carts to their designated areas. When you borrow something, return it better shape (filled up, cleaned) than when you got it.

Sure. Treat others as you want to be treated. I think I have heard that one before.

• Whenever there is an argument between two sides, find the third side.

Slavery. Abortion. Access to the ballot. Immigration. Nuclear war. Child sex trafficking.

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@porknubbins 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> * Getting cheated occasionally is the small price for trusting the best of everyone, because when you trust the best in others, they generally treat you best.*

This is very good advice that my family never follow because of short sighted idea that everyone is out to cheat you. You get so much more out of life by being cooperative and vulnerable than you do by protecting yourself from all risk of being cheated.

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@ozim 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

> Whenever there is an argument between two sides, find the third side.

> Lower the toilet seat after use.

Close the frigging lid for Pete’s sake!

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@Claudus 2 months

Replying to @npalli 🎙

Well, I found two that were particularly insightful and applicable to the rest of the list:

“Half the skill of being educated is learning what you can ignore.”

and:

“90% of everything is crap.”

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