Hacker News Re-Imagined

Writing one sentence per line

  • 849 points
  • 16 days ago

  • @Tomte
  • Created a post

Writing one sentence per line


@enriquto 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

beautiful html, indeed!

Reply


@mixedmath 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I write a lot of LaTeX and articles. I sort of do this, except that I also really want reasonable line lengths. Each sentence starts on its own line, but I also hard wrap at 80 characters. I have a completely different set of editing tidbits for writing equations.

Reply


@luhn 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

One big advantage not mentioned in the article particularly relevant to this audience: git diffs (or your VCS of choice). One sentence per line means diffs will operate per-sentence, rather than per-paragraph. This way the diff can capture the restructuring of the paragraph (adding/removing/replacing a sentence), which gives much more insight than swapping out the paragraph wholesale. It also means minor changes (e.g. typo fixes) will only add+delete a single sentence, making it much easier to identify what has actually changed from one commit to the next.

I take this a step further and will often split out a single sentence into a clause per line, but this is a judgement call rather than a hard and fast rule.

Reply


@davnn 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I write one sentence per line as well, but use line wrapping to make it more readable during writing. Reading long sentences on a single line is unpleasant imho.

I‘ll try switching from line wrap to full display to get a better picture of the overall structure.

If the structure is easy to recognize I would probably prefer a simple model that tells me a good line length for the current line I‘m in, e.g. a simple writing plugin for the editor of choice.

Reply


@vishkk 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

“Words are not forms of a single word.

In the sum of the parts, there are only the parts.

The world must be measured by eye.”

- Wallace Stevens

Reply


@bee_rider 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

It is the easy way to do things when writing LaTeX in vim.

Reply


@lqet 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I started doing this mostly for cleaner commits in version control systems. After a while I also noticed it made the writing more concise. It's much easier to spot redundant "filler" sentences.

Reply


@abhayhegde 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Similar advice was given by a famous VC, Tomasz Tunguz, a few years ago: https://tomtunguz.com/writing-separate-lines/

Reply


@drewg123 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Just please, for the love of god, don't do it in slack. Nothing annoys me more than a colleague writing a long slack message when I'm AFK, and having my watch buzz like an angry bee when they hit one carriage return (and send a new slack message) every 10 seconds.

Reply


@amake 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

\(゚Д゚)/

> be me

> write one sentence per line

> looks like greentext

> mfw

Reply


@3qz 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This is awful. It’s the LinkedIn writing style and I can’t look at it without being reminded of all the shitposting that “thought readers” do.

Thoughts?

Reply


@MengerSponge 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This is a good habit if you write LaTeX documents, particularly with collaborators. It's much easier to diff a file where each sentence has its own line!

Reply


@dilap 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

If that's too much trouble, just write your essay as a series of tweets. Similar focussing effect.

(And part of why I think the essay-as-tweet thread is so popular.)

Reply


@clord 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This is my primary objection to using 80 columns everywhere. Markdown specifically is a painful place to require it, but also latex and HTML. For source code, 80-col works out ok most of the time since "sentences" are relatively short, but even there I prefer to use more semantic line breaks when the style guide or formatting tool does not omit them.

Reply


@pauljonas 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Jose Saramago would hate this.

Reply


@hammock 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Most news articles are written one sentence per line.

You might not have ever realized this fact because the character length of a typical line is so short, both in a columnar newspaper and on an ad-ridden website.

Reply


@danw1979 15 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I love these small but significant improvements that are kind of obvious but were hidden in plain sight.

For years I didn’t even consider there was an alternive to writing in paragraphs, despite using git and markdown daily.

Reply


@cb321 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Most writing style rules are context-dependently apt. The quote by Disruptive_Dave of Gary Provost rings true for artistic writing. Sentence length limits are more helpful for technical writing like papers/documentation, with its many side-details - just as a complexity control.

Either way, though, for sentence source formatting, sentences on line boundaries also help version control systems since a diff shows the delta on a per sentence basis. Note that this is slightly different than one per line - it is more integer number of lines per sentence since some are multi-line. Same ethos, though.

Reply


@kwelstr 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

James Joyce best advice? :-O

Reply


@__MatrixMan__ 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

If what you're writing gets rendered as markdown (i.e. a readme on github), you can actually publish as one-sentence-per-line, because the markdown parser will make them into a paragraph for you.

Reply


@HeavyStorm 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I cannot disagree more profoundly with the author. Write in a very different way from which you read? From how texts are formatted in general?

Reply


@ChrisMarshallNY 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I used to do this all the time, when I worked for a Japanese company.

They used to translate my emails, "in-place," so this allowed the translators to insert a line of Kanji characters, below each of my lines.

It also taught me to be frugal in my content, but you'd never know it, reading my stuff, these days...

Reply


@Mageek 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I absolutely love doing this. I often write in LaTeX, where new lines don’t effect the typeset output. It is so much easier to see git diffs, comment sentences out, move sentences, identify a sentence by its line number, etc. as well.

Reply


@myfonj 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Reading this makes me think it might be generally beneficial to finally convey the semantics of sentence boundaries to the resulting output as well, like some `<p><span>Sentence #1.</span> <span>Sentence #2.</span>` wrappers: it would introduce possibility (for author or user) to break it into lines again or apply any other styling, and might improve interaction (think: select single sentence), or some further processing or contextual styling (think "make all single-sentence paragraphs stand out".)

Strange there is no truly "semantic" way to mark-up sub-paragraph chunk of text in HTML; all 'inline' tags are intended for "words" or for including several sentences at once (like emphasis, quote, code, sample, mark, etc.). I have some murky memory I've read some discussion explaining that the concept of "sentence" is quite problematic and in no way universal, but cannot dig it up now.

(This comment started as But how are we supposed to sneak our beloved double spaces between sentences in the output now? semi-pun, but after all, this post-processing idea answers it.)

Reply


@dang 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I tell founders not to write like this, at least for HN, and I edit their launch posts when they do (https://news.ycombinator.com/launches), because it reads like a sales letter.

But the OP is saying that it's useful to make the sausage that way, not sell it that way, which is a different point.

Reply


@ngrilly 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I'm doing that almost systemically when writing Markdown for similar reasons to the blog post author.

Reply


@longrod 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

For me context is very important. Separating out the sentences, although makes them stand on their own, often sounds discontinuous and jarring like a too long pause. Not to mention how awkward it looks on the page (if double spaced which I prefer).

That's not to say it's a bad technique. It might work for some, not for others. For me it doesn't.

I have found writing to be much like coding where if you think through the idea properly, writing to the end is not such a big problem. The main hurdles is getting stuck which is often an indicator of a poorly thoughtout idea.

The other thing that helps me escape the over-editting issue is putting my words down with as much brevity is possible. The more fluff there is, the harder it is to change. Simpler to read, simpler to edit.

Reply


@meken 11 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I like a version of this technique the best for curing writer’s block.

When I sit down and try and write the “perfect paragraph”, I get paralyzed. But if I just start barfing out semi-coherent thoughts line by line, I find I’m able to get unblocked, then I can come back and edit.

Reply


@rvnx 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This is perfect in the era of fast-food media like TikTok or shorts. We don't need long sentences, 140-chars are enough.

Reply


@supersrdjan 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

One sentence per line can paralyze your writing. It invites you to over-scrutinize each line and lose sight of the whole. It's a view that's better suited for analysis than synthesis. So it's better for editing than composing.

Reply


@rpastuszak 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I approach this by separating writing from editing. Just keep writing, ignore the typos, self-censorship or formatting and keep moving.

So, I've build myself an app to make that easier. Essentially, it's just a more stupid version of a text box. It's free, it's private, and it's meant to put you in the state of flow.

I've been using it every day for the past 3 years or so and I know that some people find it useful too, but even if I was the only user, I'd still be quite happy with it, since I suck at sticking with habits :)

Check it out!

https://enso.sonnet.io

Reply


@kstenerud 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

When I write for myself, it's all over the place. Mostly it's short phrases, unordered lists and the odd diagram, followed by lines of --- to separate thought arenas. All of these are fragments of ideas that I feel will probably be important to the finished piece. Usually about half of them actually are.

I just continue writing down thoughts as they occur, any time they happen during the day or during periods of concentration on the piece itself. If the current thought is not an extension of the last thing I wrote, I make a new line and start the new thought.

Here's a small section of draft notes for a technical article that I never published:

    Streaming only for top level args, not deeply nested.... ?
    - With set of files, need lots of streams of data.
    -- How to get metadata when ordering not guaranteed?

    ------------------------------------

    Is there a way to evaluate, send data from smallest piece to biggest piece?
    - Walk the tree, assign weights to branches?

    If a hierarchy contains multiple big data pieces, how to tell the receiving function?

    Some method to pump in top level args X items at a time?
    - 1 item at a time for non-array, x bytes at a time for array

    -----------------------------------
Every so often I'll draw another line and summarize everything in a way that succinctly discusses what I'm writing about in note form. Then I draw another line and start writing notes again.

Eventually, the summary notes start to feel solid in my mind, at which point I turn them into prose and then start embedding my notes between the paragraphs, turning them into sentences only once I feel I know where they should go in the overall piece. Once the notes finally disappear from the prose, I have my first draft.

Reply


@swamp40 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I have to do this in my emails. Most people just ignore the second and third sentences in a paragraph. No idea why, drives me crazy - but this does help.

You can tell they don't read them because they ask questions that were answered in them.

Reply


@golergka 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Its also very comfortable when you're using vim or vim-emulation plugin in another editor.

Reply


@black_puppydog 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Or, with a bit more nuance: Semantic line breaks

https://sembr.org/

Reply


@joegahona 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I read Ken Rand's "10% Solution"[0] in ~2001 on the recommendation of longtime Washington Post copy chief Bill Walsh, who died a few years ago[1]. I can't believe how much of its advice has stuck with me and how much it has helped me. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to optimize their writing.

[0] https://www.amazon.com/10-Solution-Ken-Rand-ebook/dp/B07FC7G...

[1] https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/bill-walsh-copy-editor-...

Reply


@iainctduncan 15 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Am I the only one thinking this thread should be immortalized as the ultimate example of how poorly HN readers read things before shit-posting about articles? Sigh.

A) He says in the SOURCE not the published, in literally the third paragraph. B) Count the damned sentences in the first handful of paragraphs. 2,3,3,1,4. He's clearly not saying you should do the stupid one paragraph per sentence nonsense in the published article.

This is a great idea for those of us who like writing prose in vim. Will adopt!

Reply


@michaelmior 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I personally use this approach but mostly because a lot of what I write ends up in a git repository and diffs make way more sense when there is only one sentence per line. I also find things much easier to manipulate in vim when sentences don't span lines.

Reply


@bertil 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I remember struggling to write essays when I was in highschool. Well, I was fine, but my teachers insisted it was long-winded gibberish. Concerned, my grand’mother told me: “Ask Sonia” I knew she was her friend, and they liked to argue a lot, but I was a bit confused by the advice.

It turns out, editing was Sonia’s job: she was the head reader at a very prestigious publishing house, meaning she was giving notes and feedback to very famous authors, including four Nobel Prize laureates. You kind of have to know what you are doing when you are sending a manuscript full of red in the margins and the person can respond “I’ve got a Nobel Prize and you don’t.” She definitely had the icey stare to match.

Oddly, her advice was incredibly simple, and fitted in two very short pieces:

* Subject, Verb, Complement –– in that order. If you see two verbs, but a period between them.

* Things are confusing if you don’t put them in order: start by the beginning, find the widest piece of context that explain the rest.

I don’t apply her rules every time, but for every technical document, every time I’ve tried, it’s been night and day.

That typographic argument is really resonating with me.

Reply


@throwawayHN378 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Been doing this forever but not for a particular reaso.

Reply


@danielvaughn 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I always do this for markdown, makes it waaay easier to edit, reason about, cut, etc.

Reply


@elfrinjo 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I completely agree. Using one line per sentence (and soemtime more lines when the sentence is longer) makes it way easier to structure the text. Markdown and are perfectly able to fit the text to the device you are reading on. It also makes version control and diffs more usable.

However, I can also agree that this style might be not suitable for non-technical writing.

Reply


@trasz 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This is how man pages are written, and in the long run it’s really convenient. I’m guessing that’s also why it recently become the rule for FreeBSD documentation, after migrating from DocBook to AsciiDoc.

Reply


@bronikowski 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

As a fan of Proust I feel he already did that but not in the way Derek intended.

It's more like "One sentence per page(s) — https://nathanbrixius.wordpress.com/2013/10/30/the-five-long...

Reply


@generalpf 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Is this what inspires LinkedIn engagement hackers?

Reply


@jvanderbot 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

If you've ever had LaTeX docs in version control, you'll quickly appreciate this approach as well, since VCS is much more sane when dealing with lines.

Reply


@edpichler 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

It is an advice for Internet only, right?

Reply


@quickthrower2 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Is this why HN joins consecutive lines? This is on line 2.

And this is on line 4.

Reply


@innocentoldguy 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I write this way in Asciidoc, with a single line break between sentences and two line breaks between paragraphs, since it automatically compiles into normal paragraphs when I generate PDFs or Word documents. It makes editing so much easier.

Reply


@cjsawyer 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I love the irony of using a two sentence opening paragraph to sing the praises of not using paragraphs.

Good advice though ;)

Reply


@dandare 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Maybe this is the right thread to ask for help:

I am looking for resources on the technical aspects of creative writing. Like this post. Or as mentioned below, on using semantic line breaks https://sembr.org/

I am trying to improve my creative writing style but most what I find on Google is about the creative aspect and not about the technical aspect.

Reply


@Disruptive_Dave 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety.

Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals–sounds that say listen to this, it is important.

So I write with a combination of short, medium, and long sentences. Create a sound that pleases the reader’s ear. Don’t just write words. Write music.

(Gary Provost)

Reply


@who-shot-jr 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This is my sentence.

There are many like it, but this one is mine.

Reply


@wnoise 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Many comments have mentioned both the benefits to diffing, and various --word-diff options. Unfortunately word-merge tools are harder to find. You can of course use smudge/clean filters to unwrap and rewrap text, but those are quite fiddly to set up and fragile in practice.

It isn't the main point of https://github.com/neilbrown/wiggle , but it can actually diff and merge on a word basis. A git merge driver is fairly easy to set up.

Reply


@mic47 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

And it makes git diff pretty.

Reply


@gist 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

> My advice to anyone who writes: Try writing one sentence per line. I’ve been doing it for twenty years, and it improved my writing more than anything else.

Who is the judge of 'it improved my writing more than anything else'? What was the 'anything else' for that matter.

This is a particular writing style just like Aaron Sorkin has a particular style. Some people like that style to others it's annoying.

https://thescriptlab.com/features/10569-5-secrets-to-aaron-s...

> We sometimes write sentences that don’t need to exist. Hidden in a paragraph, we might not notice. Standing on their own, we notice. Delete any sentence not worthy of its own line.

If you proofread and review what you write why would you not notice?

Reply


@stewfortier 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I think the spirit of this advice translates well to publishing style, too.

I get intimidated when I see big blocks of text.

But take that same, intimidating block and thoughtfully break it into short, punchier paragraphs and I'm in.

Shorter paragraphs make it easier for me to skim and get a sense of where something is going. They also give me more chances to pause, catch my breath, and internalize what I'm reading.

This is harder for me to do in a big block of text where I'm afraid I'll lose my place if I divert my attention.

Reply


@qudat 15 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

His rationale is also why I enjoy writing in list format. https://lists.sh is great for one sentences per line writing style.

Reply


@gjvc 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

just don't take this as "one sentence per paragraph" unless you want to sound like a used-car salesman.

Reply


@oever 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

It's like poetry.

Reply


@nunez 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

this is actually really good advice. shorter paragraphs force you to be concise, and concise is really good in short-attention-span mediums like reddit or email.

Reply


@AndyJado 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Here is an app takes one line as first class citizen.

it records the time you spend on each line.

it feels like writing on paper, but more efficient if you dealing with lines.

https://github.com/AndyJado/Boya

Reply


@elchin 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

LaTeX does the same as Markdown and HTML - I used to do this when I was in academia.

Reply


@wheybags 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Slightly off topic, but a pet peeve of mine is how you don't get a real line break in markdown when you insert a newline. Sometime I want a line break without a vertical apace for a new paragraph, I can't be the only one here! I know I can normally just add a br tag, but that looks nasty when you read it as plain text.

Reply


@lo5 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Related: Cormac McCarthy’s tips on how to write a great science paper[1]

> Limit each paragraph to a single message. A single sentence can be a paragraph. [...] > Keep sentences short, simply constructed and direct. [...]

[1] https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02918-5

Reply


@aasasd 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Such, errr, ‘giants’ as BBC evidently already adhere to this advice, and others follow in their step.

Though I suspect that the motivation is different.

Reply


@btrettel 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙



@globular-toast 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This is not a bad idea. Any decent toolchain will support rendering as paragraphs, including LaTeX. Another advantage not stated is version control and diffs work much better. You do have to put up with long lines, but most editors support wrapping long lines for display purposes.

I wish I had done this while writing my PhD thesis.

Reply


@mjcohen 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

The mathematician Lillian R. Lieber wrote a number of expository books in which the text had one phrase per line. I found this extremely easy to read, and I write my LaTex this way, which makes it very easy to edit.

Here is what the previous paragraph would look like in her style:

The mathematician Lillian R. Lieber

wrote a number of expository books

in which the text had one phrase per line.

I found this extremely easy to read,

and I write my LaTex this way,

which makes it very easy to edit.

I highly recommend the wikipedia article about her and its references:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillian_Rosanoff_Lieber#Unusua...

Reply


@dws 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Elsewhere, https://sive.rs/book/ShortSentences, Sivers recommends "Several Short Sentences About Writing", which is a perspective on writing that I'd not seen before. A useful read if you want to practice his present advice.

Reply


@erellsworth 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Tangentially related:

"Omit needless words."

-William Strunk, The Elements of Style

Highly recommended book for anyone who wants to be a more effective writer.

Reply


@personlurking 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Reminds me a bit of Jordan Peterson's advice to rewrite every sentence until it's the best it can be, and then repeat that with each paragraph.

His son recently released Essay, a tool to help write better, in the sense mentioned above.

https://essay.app

Reply


@preseinger 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

One sentence per line makes prose feel sanctimonious, even self-aggrandizing. I find this dude's writing un-readable for exactly this reason. All of his articles are like HTML versions of the Ducks Go Quack TED Talk [0]. I just roll my eyes.

[0] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tom6_ceTu9s

Reply


@sequoia 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I'm surprised no one has mentioned ventilated prose, which is like this but even moreso: https://vanemden.wordpress.com/2009/01/01/ventilated-prose/

Reply


@nojs 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

> Not publishing one sentence per line, no. Write like this for your eyes only.

Many news outlets now use this as standard for publishing.

Random example: every article at https://www.abc.net.au/

I challenge you to find a (non-quote) paragraph with more than one sentence!

Reply


@pkdpic 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Ok.

I love it.

This could change everything.

Future historians may thank us.

Seriously.

Reply


@mad44 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

I had copied this Emacs macro just for doing that.

;; one sentence per line (defun wrap-at-sentences () "Fills the current paragraph, but starts each sentence on a new line." (interactive) (save-excursion ;; Select the entire paragraph. (mark-paragraph) ;; Move to the start of the paragraph. (goto-char (region-beginning)) ;; Record the location of the end of the paragraph. (setq end-of-paragraph (region-end)) ;; Wrap lines with 'hard' newlines (i.e., real line breaks). (let ((use-hard-newlines 't)) ;; Loop over each sentence in the paragraph. (while (< (point) end-of-paragraph) ;; Determine the region spanned by the sentence. (setq start-of-sentence (point)) (forward-sentence) ;; Wrap the sentence with hard newlines. (fill-region start-of-sentence (point)) ;; Delete the whitespace following the period, if any. (while (char-equal (char-syntax (preceding-char)) ?\s) (delete-char -1)) ;; Insert a newline before the next sentence. (insert "\n")))))

(global-set-key (kbd "M-j") 'wrap-at-sentences)

Reply


@jillesvangurp 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Good advice. There are a few nice tools out there to support technical writing. I think one of them was featured on HN a few days ago: vale.

This is a tool that allows for applying simple regular expression based rules to enforce style rules. The idea is that you can tune this to your needs and cover all sorts of stylistic rules. For example, gender neutrality might be a desirable thing in the documentation for some tech companies and you can get it to flag things that are clearly not gender neutral.

Another thing worth mentioning is Jetbrains Grazie Professional (warning it's different from the normal grazie plugin, which is confusing), which actually integrates vale and can be used as a plugin for editing both code comments and markdown files in Intellij and other Jetbrains IDEs.

In general, treating text like you would treat programming code as a thing that has rules that can be figured out and enforced is a good mindset. I learned to write coherent text while doing my Ph. D. a long time ago. At some point I figured out that anything I'm doing consistently wrong, I can just learn to do consistently right. I just need to be open for criticism and figure out why something is wrong/not ideal. You kind of learn to look for things that you've done wrong before in your own text and then you fix it. A lot of these rules aren't rocket science. You just need to know about them. There's a whole grey area between grammatically correct and stylistically pleasing/acceptable. Having tools point out things that are likely problematic helps.

Reply


@keewee7 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

Months ago I noticed that I was doing this because of a (bad?) coding habit. It meant that my writing was recognizable across multiple reddit and discussion board accounts I don't want to be associated with each other. I stopped Writing One Sentence per Line after that.

Reply


@Hendrikto 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This reads like it was written by a third-grader. Accessible? Maybe. Enjoyable? Not in my book.

As a German speaker, I feel like English prose is already extremely biased towards short sentences. This makes some sense, as German has much more grammar to make these sentences readable and unambiguous.

At some point, I feel like making sentences even shorter does not aid the readability, but rather stands in its way.

Reply


@planetsprite 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

tech bloggers discover greentexting

Reply


@bregma 16 days

Replying to @Tomte 🎙

This was the rule in the 1980s when using nroff and it's a habit I developed when using any markup. It's good to know that it's been rediscovered again as newcomers mature in their tool use.

Reply


About Us

site design / logo © 2022 Box Piper