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‘Anti-hunger’ molecule forms after exercise, scientists discover

  • 289 points
  • 12 days ago

  • @echen
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‘Anti-hunger’ molecule forms after exercise, scientists discover


@sto_hristo 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

That is so ironic.

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@johnnyApplePRNG 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

I wonder if it's whatever gives you that runner's high...

Stimulants of all kinds suppress appetite.

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@flobosg 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

> It has also been reported that as an additive N-L-lactoyl phenylalanine improves the taste of food, conferring an umami flavor. It is found naturally in significant amounts in some traditional Chinese fermented foods such as preserved pickles and soy sauce.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-Phe

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@irthomasthomas 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

And yet the received wisdom of centuries says to exercise to work up an appetite.

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@sdo72 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

This is what I do all the time when controlling my weight, going through long fasting periods. I know for the fact that when being active even with 10-15 mins jog, I'm more insulin sensitive and it staves off my hunger immediately.

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@psiops 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

This would explain why exercise causes weight loss even though people with sedentary and active lifestyles seem to burn the same amount of calories[1]

[1] https://dupri.duke.edu/news-events/news/herman-pontzer-expla...

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@benreesman 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

If this is just me whinging then I apologize, but in my own life and among some people I know: the insane bifurcation into monster fitness where it’s more important than your job and “no one cares” seems to be a driver of careless weight management.

The standard of being “in shape” has gotten so absurd, and the nonlinear payoff around fitness so steep at the “maybe doing some pretty extreme shit” cutoff that I’m personally surprised I have t just given up, and it seems a lot of people have.

I don’t know if it’s TikTok, or Marvel movies, or whatever: but “fucking mutant superhero” used to one among many attractive archetypes.

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@catchclose8919 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Anecdata: exercise massively reduces my otherwise constant craving for processed sugars, deep fried and smoked or cured things, alcohol and smokes.

I'm not less hungry, but I'm less hungry for nasty stuff, so from my perspective there seems to be a lot of truth in this!

Context: I'm natively extremely lazy (phisically, not intellectually), I find any phisical activity a pain an a nuisance, I derive zero pleasure from any kind of sport and phyisical exercise (except hiking and skidiving, but not the phisical effort aspects of them), the release-endorphines-on-effort circuit is 100% broken for me or I just lack the receptors for those endophins... eg. 100%-lazy-cat except not fat because genetically I come from a line of people slim-no-matter-what-we-eat. (Probably more average or atletic people's bodies just don't work like mine...)

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@FpUser 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

I've "discovered" it long time ago. Basically if I feel hungry but do some activity instead of eating the hunger disappears. Does not work on long cardio activity though. Anything longer than 2-3 hours (assuming it is not a leisure walk) exhausts my reserves and makes me hungry for real.

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@FollowingTheDao 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

You know what this tells me? Manganese deficiency probably plays a role in metabolic disorders and trouble losing weight with exercise.

CNDP2, the enzyme that helps make lac-phe (N-[(S)-lactoyl]-L-phenylalanine) needs manganese as a cofactor.

https://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/Q96KP4

If you are deficient in Manganese, or need more Manganese because genetics, they you will not make as much lac-phe after working out.

And indeed they find that manganese deficiency is related to metabolic disorders.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-n...

https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-abstract/115/7/919/47559...

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@chobytes 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Yeah I believe it. I cycle like 100 miles a week on an entry level road/gravel bike... And Id say my hunger oscillates between large extremes from it.

I definitely crave horrible sugary food and salt from doing like a 3h ride... but between rides when Im recovered I often wont even want a snack or anything if offered.

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@DoreenMichele 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

“We estimate that the lac-phe pathway is responsible for about 25% of the anti-obesity effects of exercise,” Long said.

I find this article annoying. It should come as no surprise that there is a mechanism for suppressing appetite during physical activity. There is only so much blood to go around and both digestion and exercise place demands on the blood supply.

It would be a hardship to place both demands on the body at the same time consistently.

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@BrianOnHN 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Anecdata: for the past decade, my preferred way to begin a ketosis regimine has been a long run to "burn off remaining blood sugar" based on the old-wisdom of "the body starts to utilize fat after 30min of intense exercise."

This seems to work great. Fewer cravings.

I've even taken a this a step further. Running on the first morning of a 3-day fast. Works the same.

Note: I wouldn't recommend doing the above without carefully managing electrolytes. But, anyone who's been keto successfully for more than a month should understand what I mean about managing electrolytes.

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@belter 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Not paying 32 bucks for the study, but it seems the study was mostly done on mice. We share 99% percent of genes with mice but hope the 1% are important enough :-)

The abstract mentions the effect also occurs on humans and horses, without further details if they were part of the study, or if is just well known. It could be a temporary effect.

If you are trying to lose weight, change diet before starting with exercise. When at the proper weight, use exercise to keep at the correct level.

Several studies compared two groups. One group changed just diet, and other used diet and exercise from the beginning. Faster weight loss noticed in the group just doing a diet change and not doing increased exercise.

The assumption that the increase of exercise, might call for additional cravings, even if of a different type of food.

[1] "...For weight loss, diet seems to be more effective than physical activity,"... "You have to do huge amounts of physical activity to lose weight, but you can get a better energy deficit just by cutting down on calories..." ...

"...So both diet and physical activity are important,"..."Diet probably more important for losing weight. Physical activity for keeping it off..."

[2] "...Despite the prevailing advice, exercise is pretty unhelpful for weight loss..."

[1] "Mayo Clinic Minute: Which is better for losing weight – diet or exercise?": https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-mi...

[2] "Why you shouldn't exercise to lose weight, explained with 60+ studies": https://www.vox.com/2016/4/28/11518804/weight-loss-exercise-...

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@MrPatan 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

I've observed something like this on myself. I eat less, and better, when I exercise.

I don't know if you can outrun a bad diet, but maybe you can lift it.

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@arcticbull 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

And yet folks who exercise also end up having acute compensatory eating. [1] Your body is designed to maintain homeostasis.

Exercise is not how you lose weight, changing your diet up to and including fasting is. Exercise is good for you in a whole lot of other ways, but the idea you can outrun a bad diet is pretty thoroughly debunked at this point.

[1] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19419671/

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@mark_l_watson 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

I think this must be common knowledge. If I go on a long hike, I am not really hungry for a couple of hours afterwards. Often people I hike with want to immediately after the hike get food. I used to often skip going to a restaurant because I was not hungry, then decided as a practice to go anyway to be more “social.”

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@Tade0 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Now that I am a parent I often eat work for breakfast.

I've found that two things cause massive hunger in my case: a diet rich in added sugar/salt and being tired. The latter usually comes after extended exercise, so appears to be counterproductive for weight loss. Other benefits still apply though.

Just dropping added sugar/salt now that my child eats solid food helped a lot though. One benefit is a heightened (or actually: not dulled) sense of taste.

I'm currently on a "cheat week" and it's already getting annoying that food doesn't taste as good.

Dietitians say this again and again: even the best diet is no good if you can't keep to it.

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@freiherr 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

>Does this finding hold promise for that ever-elusive diet pill? I wonder what will go wrong this time with side-effects. Maybe overeating rebound after it gets out of the system. That would resemble natural compensation of calories after activity is finished.

From personal experience I recommend saturated fat (mostly from beef tallow) as an anti-hunger molecule. With as little as possible omega-6 in the diet. And carnivore. Works wonders. My satiety base level is now set so that I get down to ~12% bf in a reasonable time when I'm above that. Could also bulk up to a powerlifting competition on this diet no problem when necessary.

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@nonrandomstring 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

The article mentions that a substance (lactose-phenylalanine) appears after exercise in several animal studies. There's a suggestion of a strong connection of this to reduced appetite. But this isn't explained and more importantly there's no hypothesised mechanism. Why would it be a metabolic advantage to reduce hunger after exertion? Maybe it creates a buffer-period. Otherwise, common sense/intuition would say we feel hungrier after exercise. What gives?

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@beardedman 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Ties up pretty well with my own experience. Eating after exercise always feels like a chore.

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@linspace 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

My case is more biomechanical. Running will decrease hunger much more than cycling or the gym as it gives the stomach much less rest.

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@chriscappuccio 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

The peptide is N-lactoylphenylalanine

So a lot of folks on here are talking about the effects of exercise and stuff like endorphins.

Andrew Huberman sums it up best

1. Dopamine and testosterone are closely linked 2. Effort releases dopamine and testosterone 3. Don't spike dopamine before or after effort, let effort spike dopamine 4. Testosterone makes effort feel good (Testosterone makes you feel good) 5. Winning increases testosterone, in all venues 6. Losing decreases testosterone, in all venues

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@ge96 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Personal anecdote regarding weight loss/fitness

In 2 months I dropped 30 lbs, how was by fasting. I would only eat 1 big meal a day, as in drink coffee in the morning, not have a snack (fiber bar) until after 5PM (assuming 9-5 schedule) and then eat around 9PM/few hours before sleep. (means 1200-1500 calories per day vs. 2400+). The figure to keep in mind is a lb of fat is 3500c. Counting calories matters.

The hard thing is sticking to it (obviously) as I rebounded and I gained that weight back already. I sit at a desk/don't really go outside much. You will feel a hunger pang and you will want to eat, but it will pass.

I used to work next to a gym so it was easy to work out, I would just go to the gym after work, at times I would even work out as long as 4 hrs in a row. I was super cut back then, lifting. But the gym is now 5+ miles away from me one way and I used to go there 4-5 days a week. I could drive that but nah... 20 minutes of driving and 1-2 hrs at the gym that's a lot of lost time. Plus I used to go late at night/early morning so I had the entire gym to myself, I didn't have to wait for the squat area or bench, etc...

I'm not doing that anymore, and I'm not really interested in getting body-building sculpted, just toned/visible muscle/low body fat. So I'm doing that at home, got some bands/one of those multi-use pull up bars... but diet is the main thing... if you have low body fat you will look better than with a lot... as in good chin definition, no gut... I have this personal denial going on where I wear baggy clothes/saying "I'm not THAT overweight" but I am by about 40lbs. Film yourself externally to see.

I guess this really only matters if you care about external appearance/say trying to attract someone else, gotta meet them/be on their level.

I am in my later 20's, 6ft weight should be around 210 but I'm at low 260s as of this moment. Was high 230, low 240s in Feb. My problem is I binge eat when I'm bored/watch TV.

Last thing I'll mention, I also include some back stretching/exercise, light to keep the back strong since I sit on a stool all day (office chair but back broke off).

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@decebalus1 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Sample size of one, but I always lift weights fasted (12-16 hours fast) and I'm ready to eat a horse about an hour or two after my workout. I once ate a whole rotisserie chicken. I also crave burgers right after strenuous hikes or long bike rides. Perhaps I'm just badly configured.

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@veltas 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

I always get a monster appetite after exercise, could just be conditioning. Sample size of one.

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@pier25 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

So now they only need to synthesize it and put it in a pill!

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@davidkuennen 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Also anecdata. Whenever I'm exercising I know that I won't be hungry afterwards even if I was before. I always thought it was strange.

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@ianbutler 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

With cardio I’m more hungry later in the day but weight lifting, not only do I get a better workout I have less cravings for junk and my hunger is way less.

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@formerkrogemp 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Mass produce this. Feed to everyone. Global hunger solved?

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@zvmaz 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

That's completely counter-intuitive to me. My weight and appetite significantly drop when I stop weightlifting.

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@ravenstine 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Although this is my guess based on experience, I think said anti-hunger effect can be had without intense exercise. I've noticed consistently that walking has an anti-hunger effect. Walking does take more time than running, but it doesn't really register as stress to the body in the same way that running and other forms of cardio do, meaning a lower cortisol response. Maybe it's not as strong an effect as with something like running, but I think it's worth observing and considering. In weighing the pros and cons, I think that walking is better in terms of longevity. Cortisol and stress on joints are things you don't really want.

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@10x-dev 12 days

Replying to @echen 🎙

Anecdata: when I was intermittently fasting, I found that exercising at lunch curbed my appetite and I could easily last till dinner with no food or with a small yogurt snack (<50cal). On days when I didn't exercise, I felt hungrier and had to engage my will power much more during the day.

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